Tag Archives: Robert Whitlow

Top Ten Tuesday — Books That Made Me Buy Them!

18 Apr

This week the folks at The Broke And The Bookish are charging bloggers to name the things that makes them buy books. It’s really a combination for me. First, although you aren’t supposed to judge a book by its cover, I just can’t help it. I love old fashioned images and catchy titles. Even the font is important to me. And then there are my must-read authors. The authors I have listed below are my book club’s favorites — their books are always good and lead to great discussions. If they have a book out, I (and the rest of my group) will be buying it. So this week I am featuring 5 covers that wooed me in the book store and five authors that I automatically buy. To find out what makes other bloggers buy a book, click HERE.

5 Lovely Covers That Said Buy Me!

Have you read any of these books?

Which should I read first?

 

5 Must-Read Authors 

(And Some of Their Lovely Book Covers)

Terri Blackstock

Elizabeth Musser

 

Francine Rivers

Dan Walsh

Robert Whitlow

What Makes You Buy A Book?

Top 10 Tuesday — Best of 2016

27 Dec

2016 was a whirlwind of activity for my family. Several weddings, a couple of bucket list trips, and relocations led to a very busy year. Amid it all I did manage to read some great books — some new releases and some new to me. So, I am supposed to narrow my list to just 10. Hmm . . . can’t do it. 😉 So I have come up with two lists — Contemporary Fiction and Historical Fiction. No matter your preference of genre, there is something for you on these lists. To see what other bloggers consider their best of the best, please visit The Broke And The Bookish.

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Top Contemporary Fiction of 2016

 

Of Stillness and Storm by Michele Phoenix

Sea Rose Lane by Irene Hannon

Seeing Things by Patti Hill

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Since You’ve Been Gone by Christa Allan

Sister Dear by Laura McNeill

Song of Silence by Cynthia Ruchti

Sycamore Row by John Grisham

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Water From My Heart by Charles Martin

When Death Draws Near by Carrie Stuart Parks

The Witnesses by Robert Whitlow

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Top Historical Fiction of 2016

 

Anchor in The Storm by Sarah Sundin

AD 30 by Ted Dekker

A Day And A Life by Penelope Wilcock

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Forest Child by Heather Day Gilbert

The Inheritance by Michael Phillips

The Lady And The Lionheart by Joanne Bischof

Like A River From Its Course by Kelli Stuart

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The Memoir of Johnny Devine by Camille Eide

Though Waters Roar by Lynn Austin

Within The Veil by Brandy Valance

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Best of The Best of 2106

There were two books that I gave Very Highly Recommended ratings to in 2016. Both were from author Mike Nappa. These are great books I would recommend to everyone!

unknown2Annabel Lee

Fourteen miles east of Peachtree, Alabama, a secret is hidden. That secret’s name is Annabel Lee Truckson, and even she doesn’t know why her mysterious uncle has stowed her deep underground in a military-style bunker. He’s left her with a few German words, a barely-controlled guard dog, and a single command: “Don’t open that door for anybody, you got it? Not even me.”

Above ground, a former Army sniper called The Mute and an enigmatic “Dr. Smith” know about the girl. As the race begins to find her, the tension builds. Who wants to set her free? Why does the other want to keep her captive forever? Who will reach her first?

Private investigators Trudi Coffey and Samuel Hill need to piece together the clues and stay alive long enough to retrieve the girl–before it’s too late.

41jklpz8chl-_sx322_bo1204203200_The Raven 

As part of his regular street performance, a deception specialist who goes by the name The Raven picks his audience’s pockets while they watch. It’s harmless fun — until he decides to keep the spare wallet a city councilman doesn’t seem to miss, hoping for a few extra bucks. When he finds not money but compromising photos of the councilman and his “personal assistants”, The Raven hatches a plan to blackmail the man. However, he quickly finds himself in over his head with the Ukrainian Mafia and mired in a life-threatening plot code-named, “Nevermore”.

Private investigators Trudi Coffey and Samuel Hill must scramble to sort out the clues — and their complicated feelings for each other — to rescue The Raven and save hundreds of lives from a wildcard bent on revenge.

 

Book Review: The Witnesses

12 Aug

518j31rOpsL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_Young lawyer Parker House is on the rise—until his grandfather’s mysterious past puts both of their lives in danger.

Parker House’s secret inheritance is either his greatest blessing . . . or his deadliest curse. The fresh-faced North Carolina attorney shares his German grandfather’s uncanny ability to see future events in his mind’s eye—a gift that has haunted 82-year-old Frank House through decades of trying to erase a murderous wartime past.

While Parker navigates the intrigue and politics of small-town courtroom law, Frank is forced to face his darkest regrets. Then, a big career break for Parker collides with a new love he longs to nurture and the nightmares his grandfather can no longer escape. Sudden peril threatens to shatter not only Parker’s legal prospects but also his life and the lives of those dearest to him.

Two witnesses, two paths, an uncertain future.

 

512-S7U3OmL._UX250_Robert Whitlow grew up in north Georgia. He graduated magna cum laude from Furman University with a BA in history in 1976 and received his JD with honors from the University of Georgia School of Law in 1979. A practicing attorney, he is a partner in a Charlotte, NC law firm. He and his wife Kathy have four children and three grandchildren.

Robert began writing in 1996. His novels are set in the South and include both legal suspense and interesting characterization. It is his desire to write stories that reveal some of the ways God interacts with people in realistic scenerios.

 

My Impressions:

My book club never passes up a chance to read a novel by Robert Whitlow. Although he has scored a miss or two with us, he is a consistent favorite. His latest book, The Witnesses, is Whitlow at his best. We met last night to discuss the book. I have to admit that I finished it just minutes before walking out the door. Others in the group had not finished it, but had skimmed the ending so that they could join in on the discussion. (In our defense, we only had a 2 1/2 week turn around between meetings. We usually have at least a month.) The consensus was that we loved the book, and for those who had not completed it, that pleasure was on their agenda for the rest of the evening.

Parker House and his grandfather, Frank, are gifted with hunches and premonitions. Frank’s ability has led to some of his biggest regrets, while Parker, a young lawyer, has barely discovered the power and responsibility of his gift. The past, present and future collide as their need for a life lived with integrity is impacted by the expectations and demands of their world.

There is much to love about The Witnesses. Well-developed characters are easy to love (or hate as the case may be). My book club especially liked Frank who could have easily been a difficult character to connect with. As a former officer in the German army in WWII, he participated in operations against the Allies. But his deep sense of right and wrong and his conscience made him real and relatable. His story was the most engaging, yet we were heavily invested in Parker’s story, especially his relationship with Layla and her father/his boss, Tom Blocker. Elements of suspense, legal drama, and romance make this a story that will appeal to a wide audience. I had to take this book away from my husband so I could have it read by my meeting. He is a big fan of Whitlow, too, and is eager to get back to the story. The book encouraged a good bit of discussion, and the questions at the back went a long way in directing us. Faith elements are strong, including the theme of forgiveness that runs throughout the book. Whitlow uses God’s word and the words of others to impact the characters ( and his readers) and draw them closer to God. The idea of visions/intuition/premonitions was one that intrigued us and made us think more about what the Bible has to say about it. A book that points to what God says is a big winner for us.

We all loved our time spent with Frank, Parker and Layla — one member wished there could be a sequel. The Witnesses scores a unanimous thumbs up from By The Book!

Highly recommended.

Audience: adults.

To purchase this book, click HERE.

(I purchased this book. All opinions expressed are mine alone.)

August Book Club Selections

1 Aug

I am excited about my book clubs’ selections this month. I have already read the Page Turners‘ selection, The Ringmaster’s Wife by Kristy Cambron and am hoping for a special guest to turn up at our meeting! (More to come on that later.) By The Book is reading the latest release of our favorite authors, The Witnesses by Robert Whitlow. August looks to be a very busy month, but I am up for some really good reading. Have you read either of these books? Let us know your thoughts.

51+hlwxbkcL._SX326_BO1,204,203,200_An ounce of courage.

A leap of faith.

Together, they propel two young women to chase a new life—one that’s reimagined from what they might have become.

In turn-of-the-century America, a young girl dreams of a world that stretches beyond the confi nes of a quiet life on the family farm. With little more than her wit and a cigar box of treasures, Mable steps away from all she knows, seeking the limitless marvels of the Chicago World’s Fair. There, a chance encounter triggers her destiny—a life with a famed showman by the name of John Ringling.

A quarter of a century later, Lady Rosamund Easling boards a ship to America as a last adventure before her arranged marriage. There, the twenties are roaring, and the rich and famous gather at opulent, Gatsby-esque parties. The Jazz Age has arrived, and with it, the golden era of the American circus, whose queen is none other than the enigmatic Mable Ringling.

When Rosamund’s path crosses with Mable’s and the Ringlings’ glittering world, she makes the life-altering decision to leave behind a comfortable future of estates and propriety, choosing instead the nomadic life of a trick rider in the Ringling Brothers’ circus.

A novel that is at once captivating, deeply poignant, and swirling with exquisite historical details of a bygone world, The Ringmaster’s Wife will escort readers into the center ring, with its bright lights, exotic animals, and a dazzling performance that can only be described as the Greatest Show on Earth!

 

518j31rOpsL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_Young lawyer Parker House is on the rise — until his grandfather’s mysterious past puts both of their lives in danger.

Parker House’s secret inheritance is either his greatest blessing . . . or his deadliest curse. The fresh-faced North Carolina attorney shares his German grandfather’s uncanny ability to see future events in his mind’s eye — a gift that has haunted 82-year-old Frank House through decades of trying to erase a murderous wartime past.

While Parker navigates the intrigue and politics of small-town courtroom law, Frank is forced to face his darkest regrets. Then, a big career break for Parker collides with a new love he longs to nurture and the nightmares his grandfather can no longer escape. Sudden peril threatens to shatter not only Parker’s legal prospects but also his life and the lives of those dearest to him.

Two witnesses, two paths, an uncertain future.

Top 10 Tuesday — Five-Star Reads

29 Mar

Thanks to the folks over at The Broke And The Bookish for hosting Top 10 Tuesday every week. There are lots of book bloggers that participate, so make sure to click HERE to find out what they are up to.

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This week’s theme is 10 of My Most Recent 5-Star Reads. I have been inundated with reading blessings this year and have enjoyed lots and lots of great books. The following are the last 5-star books I have read. Make sure to check out the reviews I have linked.

Top 10 5-Star Reads

(In Alphabetical Order)

Annabel Lee by Mike Nappa (suspense)

The Body under The Bridge by Paul McCusker (mystery)

The Fragment by Davis Bunn (historical suspense)

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Guarded by Angela Correll (women’s fiction)

The Hearts We Mend by Kathryn Springer (contemporary romance)

A House Divided by Robert Whitlow (legal drama)

If I Run by Terri Blackstock (suspense)

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The Memoir of Johnny Devine by Camille Eide (historical romance)

The Prophetess by Jill Eileen Smith (biblical fiction)

Thin Ice by Irene Hannon (romantic suspense)

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Book Review: A House Divided

18 Jan

51kwubDrxcL._SX326_BO1,204,203,200_Corbin Gage can stand up to anyone . . . . But his own divided house will bring him to his knees. Corbin, a longtime legal champion for the downtrodden, is slowly drinking himself into the grave. His love for ‘mountain water’ has cost him his marriage to the godliest woman he knows, ruined his relationship with his daughter, Roxy, and reduced the business at his small Georgia law firm to a level where he can barely keep the bill collectors at bay. But it isn’t until his son, Ray, threatens to limit Corbin’s time with his grandson that Corbin begins to acknowledge he might have a problem. Despite the mess that surrounds his personal life and against the advice of everyone he knows, Corbin takes on a high-stakes tort case on behalf of two boys who have contracted non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma due to an alleged chemical exposure. The defendant, a fertilizer company, is the largest employer in the area. The lawsuit becomes a tornado that sucks Corbin, Ray, and Roxy into an increasingly deadly vortex. Equally intense pressure within the family threatens to destroy, once and for all, the thin threads that connect them. Corbin must find the strength to stand up to his personal demons. Justice for two dying boys depends on it . . . his family depends on it.

512-S7U3OmL._UX250_Robert Whitlow grew up in north Georgia. He graduated magna cum laude from Furman University with a BA in history in 1976 and received his JD with honors from the University of Georgia School of Law in 1979. A practicing attorney, he is a partner in a Charlotte, NC law firm. He and his wife Kathy have four children and three grandchildren.

Robert began writing in 1996. His novels are set in the South and include both legal suspense and interesting characterization. It is his desire to write stories that reveal some of the ways God interacts with people in realistic scenarios.

My Impressions:

My book club has read every one of Robert Whitlow’s books, except one. He is one of our all time favorite authors, but we have been a bit disappointed in his last few books. But with his latest book, A House Divided, we declare that he is back! Back with riveting stories full of strong, well-developed characters and plenty of themes to discuss. We give this novel a unanimous highly recommended read designation.

Corbin Gage is a small town lawyer whose practice has seen better days and for the most part, Corbin is to blame. Along with his career, his personal life has been impacted negatively by his drinking. Divorced from a faithful wife and with only strained relationships with his children, the only positive in his life is his grandson, Billy. But his alcoholism is about to sever that relationship as well. He has one more chance to make things right . . . will he take it?

Although A House Divided involves a court case, it serves mostly as the foundation for a larger story of choices and consequences. We enjoyed the scenes involving legal strategies both in and out of the courtroom, but it was Corbin and his family that kept us engaged with the story. Corbin is a likable character, even as he insists on ruining his life. Other characters are realistically written and some are more likable than others, though most grew on us. We also liked the look into the workings of AA, and we learned a lot about the 12-step program and how the organization works. A few in our group grew up with alcoholic fathers and the scenes depicting Corbin’s decline rang true. One member stated that it was obvious Whitlow had done his research. Whitlow reprises a theme from one of his earliest novels, The Trial. Prayers are not one-time things, but live on long after the person bringing the requests to God.

Longtime fans of Robert Whitlow will love A House Divided. And if you have never read one of his novels, we recommend this one whole-heartedly!

Highly Recommended.

Audience: adults.

Great for book clubs.

To purchase this book, click HERE.

(I purchased this book from Amazon. All opinions expressed are mine alone.)

Happy New Year! January Book Club Selections

1 Jan

Happy-New-Year-Cards-2016

It’s a new year, so it’s time for new book club selections. You can find what we are reading by clicking on BTB Picks And Page Turners in the header. January finds us returning to authors we have read and enjoyed before. By The Book is reading A House Divided by Robert Whitlow and Page Turners is reading Plum Orchard by June Hall McCash. Have you read these books? We’d love to know your thought.

UnknownCorbin Gage can stand up to anyone . . . But his own divided house will bring him to his knees. Corbin, a longtime legal champion for the downtrodden, is slowly drinking himself into the grave. His love for ‘mountain water’ has cost him his marriage to the godliest woman he knows, ruined his relationship with his daughter, Roxy, and reduced the business at his small Georgia law firm to a level where he can barely keep the bill collectors at bay. But it isn’t until his son, Ray, threatens to limit Corbin’s time with his grandson that Corbin begins to acknowledge he might have a problem. Despite the mess that surrounds his personal life and against the advice of everyone he knows, Corbin takes on a high-stakes tort case on behalf of two boys who have contracted non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma due to an alleged chemical exposure. The defendant, a fertilizer company, is the largest employer in the area. The lawsuit becomes a tornado that sucks Corbin, Ray, and Roxy into an increasingly deadly vortex. Equally intense pressure within the family threatens to destroy, once and for all, the thin threads that connect them. Corbin must find the strength to stand up to his personal demons. Justice for two dying boys depends on it . . . his family depends on it.

 

Unknown“Following on the heels of her critically acclaimed Almost to Eden, 2011 Georgia Author of the Year June Hall McCash once again delivers a story of hope and renewal with Plum Orchard. The saga is set on Cumberland Island during plantation-era Georgia and centers around a remarkable woman known as Elisabeth Bernardey. Zabette, as she is called, was born the illegitimate daughter of a planter and a slave and was raised as the planter’s daughter, so she finds herself neither completely free nor totally in bondage. Plum Orchard chronicles her journey through the Antebellum South as she strives to live in two worlds while belonging totally to neither. This epic tale spans a large portion of the nineteenth century and is a narrative that explores both the darkness that was slavery and the light that lives within the human heart.”
-Raymond L. Atkins, award-winning author of The Front Porch Prophet and Sorrow Wood