Tag Archives: missions

Book Review: Mercy Triumphs

10 Sep

Three women. Three impossible circumstances. One merciful God.

Mia, an American Christian, has lived in Sudan so long that persecution, harassment, and danger have become commonplace for her. Her tough outer shell threatens to harden her heart while her newly Christian friends, Halimah and Rania, former Muslims, are forced to live in exile outside Sudan. All three quickly discover that escaping danger in one place only means facing even greater challenges elsewhere. As God’s mercy becomes evident in their lives, they must choose whether or not to offer mercy to those who don’t deserve it.

Third in a trilogy, Mercy Triumphs opens the reader’s eyes to modern-day persecution and the life of Muslims in Sudan. Based on real-life events, Mercy Triumphs reveals some of the struggles Christians face when living under Islamic law. The reader will be inspired to pray for new believers, those who are persecuted for their faith, and even for the salvation of the persecutors.

Author of the captivating novel Side by Side, Jana Kelley is a Texan who hardly ever lives in Texas. Raised in Southeast Asia, Jana developed a love for cross-cultural living early in life. Her love for writing came soon after. Jana returned to Texas to attend East Texas Baptist University. She and her husband married a month after she graduated, and by their second anniversary, they were living in a remote African town. After 13 years living in Africa and the Middle East, Jana, her husband, and their three boys moved to Southeast Asia where they currently live.

Find out more about Jana at http://www.janakelley.com.

My Impressions:

It should be stated up front that Mercy Triumphs is the third and final book in Jana Kelley’s trilogy set in the Muslim world of Sudan. You really have to start at the beginning of this series to get the full impact of these books. But you are in luck, because you can binge read the whole series from start to finish and not have to wait to find out what God has in store for the Mia, Halimah, and Rania, the three young women you will come to love, respect, and consider sisters in Christ. Yes, this book is a work of fiction, but Kelley knows first hand what it means to live in a world that is hungry for God, yet is closed to His message of freedom in Christ. I cannot recommend Mercy Triumphs (really the entire series) enough. For those who have a love for people of different cultures, for those who have a love for God’s command to make disciples, and for those who feel a stirring in their spirit to find out where God is working, this book is for you.

Mia and her family have been living in Sudan for three years. Her husband works for an aid organization and Mia spends her days raising her children and trying to speak words of truth to those who God has put in her path. Not formal missionaries, for Sudan is a closed country, the Weston family nevertheless looks for opportunities to share Jesus. Meanwhile two sisters with whom Mia has crossed paths, Halimah and Rania, are living outside their beloved Sudan because they have become Christians. Danger is as much a part of life as the dust is in Sudan, yet God is good and merciful and has plans for the three women that they don’t expect.

Kelley’s three book series would be perfect for a book discussion group or missions study. Mercy Triumphs examines a number of things — the real meaning of freedom in Christ, living without fear, following God wherever He leads, trusting God instead of others and self. The story is highly readable, and the characters are very real with flaws and failings, but strong faith. I learned so much about the Muslim culture and the role of women. It’s easy to view Muslims through the lens of the nightly news. Mercy Triumphs paints a true picture — the good, the bad, and the very beautiful.

Mercy Triumphs is a highly recommended read! Get the whole series and begin on a journey of faith and discovery — about the world and about yourself.

Highly Recommended.

Audience: older teens and adults.

To purchase, click HERE.

(Thanks to New Hope Publishers and LitFuse for a review copy. All opinions expressed are mine alone.)

 

Advertisements

Book Review + Author Interview — Healing Love by Jennifer Slattery

26 Jul

A news anchor intern has it all planned out, and love isn’t on the agenda.

Brooke Endress is on the cusp of her lifelong dream when her younger sister persuades her to chaperone a mission trip to El Salvador. Packing enough hand sanitizer and bug spray to single-handedly wipe out malaria, she embarks on what she hopes will be a once-in-a-lifetime experience.

But Brooke is blindsided by the desperation for hope and love she sees in the orphans’ eyes. And no less by the connection she feels with her handsome translator. As newfound passion blooms, Brooke wrestles with its implications for her career dreams.

Ubaldo Chavez, teacher and translate, knows the struggle that comes with generational poverty. But he found the way out – education – and is determined to help his students rise above.

When he agrees to translate for a mission team from the United States he expects to encounter a bunch of “missional tourists” full of empty promises. Yet an American news anchor defies his expectations, and he finds himself falling in love. But what does he have to offer someone with everything?

My Impressions:

Healing Love can be categorized as a contemporary romance since it has a love story that develops throughout the book. But its message is so much more than that. If anything it tells the story of a young woman who falls in love with God’s people. Inspired by a mission trip the author’s family participated in, this dual setting novel (California and El Salvador) explores the desperate needs of people and our response to it. I really liked this one, and if you have a heart for missions and love a happily-ever-after ending, you will too!

Brooke Endress is two years out of grad school and pursuing her dream of working in broadcast journalism. Reluctantly she agrees to accompany her teenaged sister on a mission trip to El Salvador. As Brooke is confronted with the realities of the desperate life of poverty in that country, her whole perspective is turned upside down. Translator Ubaldo Calla has his worldview challenged as well when discovers that the beautiful North American is not the spoiled woman he thought, but deeply caring with a love for his home country.

The contrast between American life and the crippling poverty of El Salvador is uncovered in Healing Love. This novel brought the struggle of survival to life for this reader. Slattery doesn’t shy away from sharing the problems of El Salvador — poverty, child labor, sexual abuse, poor education. The missions team that Brooke accompanies makes an impression, but it is really long term action that is required to truly make a difference. I really liked the spiritual growth that Brooke and Ubaldo undergo as they heal relationships and touch lives.

Full of heart, faith, and love, Healing Love is a great story. It is one that will leave you thinking long after the last page is turned. It is an especially good choice for a book club or missions group.

Recommended.

Audience: adults.

To purchase, click HERE. (It’s free for Kindle Unlimited!)

(Thanks to the author for a complimentary copy. All opinions expressed are mine alone.)

Author, speaker, and ministry leader Jennifer Slattery writes for Crosswalk.com and is the managing and acquiring editor for Guiding Light Women’s Fiction, an imprint with Lighthouse Publishing of the Carolinas. She believes fiction has the power to transform lives and change the culture. Healing Love is her sixth novel, and it was birthed during a trip she and her family took to El Salvador that opened her eyes to the reality of generational poverty and sparked a love for orphans and all who’ve experienced loss.

Her deepest passion is to help women experience God’s love and discover, embrace, and live out who they are in Christ. As the founder of Wholly Loved Ministries, she travels with her team to various churches to speak to women and help them experience the love and freedom only Christ can offer. When not writing, editing, or speaking, you’ll likely find her chatting with her friends or husband in a quiet, cozy coffeehouse. Visit her online at JenniferSlatteryLivesOutLoud.com and connect with her and her Wholly Loved team at WhollyLoved.com.

Q&A with Jennifer Slattery

When did you begin to write?

I’ve been writing in one fashion or another since I learned to hold a pencil. I wrote my first story (or at least, the first one I remember) when I was in maybe fourth or fifth grade for a young author’s contest. I remember being selected from my class, though I can’t remember what I was selected for! Maybe to have my story included in a publication?

For years, I wrote poems, which is interesting because now I stink at poetry, though I do often write song lyrics for my stories. (Music can be such a powerful way to connect with God and soak in truth!). I never really pursued publication or even thought about what that might look like until about a decade ago when I began to sense a clear call from God. I felt God was telling me not only was I to write, and write for Him, but this was to be my predominant focus.

After a bit of resisting (for numerous reasons all related to pride and fear), I surrendered, plunked myself in front of my computer, and penned what later became Breaking Free (my fourth and so far, most popular, release).

What led you to write Healing Love?

The idea for this story came while on a plane ride leaving El Salvador, a country I was initially nervous to visit but quickly became reluctant to leave. Our family joined our church (at the time) for a weeklong mission trip, during which we served at an orphanage for girls who had been sexually abused. It was an incredibly emotional and eye-opening experience.

I left with a broken heart and a large pile of letters the girls had written to me before we left. Those letters remain in the top drawer of my bedside table to this day and serve as a reminder of God’s call to love — however and whenever I can.

On the plane ride back, tears pricking my eyes, letters in my lap, I processed all I’d experienced and saw during my week. All God had shown me, not just about the El Salvador people and the sweet orphans I had so quickly fallen in love with, but about His heart. And almost instantly, a story idea took hold.

The next six months or so were incredibly painful as I researched what life was really like for countless families in El Salvador, many of whom have no choice but to work long hours in the hot sun, many of whom are forced to have their children as young as seven and eight working beside them. Many others who live on trash heaps, scavenging for food. Others still who, desperate to survive, sell their children into sex trafficking. Women and children who’ve sold themselves.

One of the downfalls of having a writer’s brain is that everything in my mind plays out in vivid detail. Add to that the fact that I have a bit of OCD, and my brain can get stuck on replay mode, in this case, a replay that utterly broke me.

One afternoon, I went for a walk, trying not to think about all I learned and the precious children our family had encountered — trying not to see their faces as they flashed through my mind — I started to pray. I don’t remember what I said, except that I asked God why He was allowing me to see such heartache and pain, such suffering.

And as if in response, a gentle yet clear thought arose: This is what He sees daily, only more so. Not only does He see the pain, but He hears their constant, desperate cries as they beg for aid.

Aid that, most often, comes through you and I.

In what ways can you relate to Brooke, the heroine in Healing Love?

Oh, my word! In many, and not always the best of ways. I’ve already admitted I have a bit of OCD. In other words, I like to control my world and everything in it. As with Brooke, this comes out strongest when I feel out of control — threatened, vulnerable. Fearful. When instead I should be turning to God in surrender — because that’s when I find strength and peace. But I’m learning, as is Brooke.

In what ways can you relate to Ubaldo, the hero?

Sweet Ubaldo. He means well, and he’s done and is doing a lot of good. I love that he’s driven by his integrity and a genuine love for others. But he can get so focused on doing what he believes to be right that he can in fact hurt others and push them away. I can do that, also. My stubborn, passionate side can become too passionate, working against me and whatever God is calling me to do. Finding the balance between love and truth, passion and grace, can be hard. But again, I’m learning.

Thanks, Jennifer, for sharing your story and your heart!

 

Book Review: Door to Freedom

2 Mar

51yprx5maxl-_sx322_bo1204203200_It’s rough and it’s smooth. It’s dark and it’s light. It’s a masterpiece. It’s us. Here in Sudan. We are scared of it and drawn to it. There is an open door, and there is much opposition.

In the dusty, Islamic country of Sudan, Mia, who is raising her family in a Muslim country, has learned to boldly share her faith. Rania, the daughter of a wealthy Sudanese Arab, seeks to find the reason for her sister’s sudden disappearance. Mia holds some of the answers, but both women quickly discover they must each walk through their own doors to freedom, the freedom that only comes when you trust God’s sovereignty more than manmade security.

Part of New Hope Publishers’ line of contemporary missional fiction, Door to Freedom, the sequel to Side by Side, opens the reader’s eyes to modern-day persecution and the life of Muslims in Sudan. Based on real-life events, Door to Freedom also reveals some of the struggles that Christians face when living under Islamic law. The reader will be inspired to pray for those who are persecuted for their faith as well as for the salvation of the persecutors.

jkelley-420-pngAuthor of the captivating novel Side by Side, Jana Kelley is a Texan who hardly ever lives in Texas. Raised in Southeast Asia, Jana developed a love for cross-cultural living early in life. Her love for writing came soon after. Jana returned to Texas to attend East Texas Baptist University. She and her husband married a month after she graduated, and by their second anniversary, they were living in a remote African town. After 13 years living in Africa and the Middle East, Jana, her husband, and their three boys moved to Southeast Asia where they currently live.
Find out more about Jana at http://www.janakelley.com.

 

My Impressions:

What is it like to live in a place where the free exercise of religion is non-existent? A place where belief in Jesus is dangerous? Door to Freedom, the second book by Jana Kelley, continues the story of the Westons, a family who come to Sudan to provide physical relief to the people, but who are also committed to sharing the hope and peace available through Jesus Christ. This book is an eye-opener — cultural differences, governmental harassment, and opposition from friend and foe are woven into a highly readable contemporary novel. If you want to know more about life for those on the front lines of mission work, you need to get Door to Freedom.

Two storylines run throughout Door to Freedom. Mia’s story was begun in book 1, Side by Side, and progresses as she and her husband anticpate another two year commitment to life in Sudan. On the other side of Khartoum lives Rania, the sister of Halimah who figured prominently in Side by Side. Although there is little intersection between the two women, the stories are complimentary as they show both sides of life in a Muslim country. Mia struggles to share her faith with Sudanese women, and Rania seeks peace in a dangerous place, the Gospel of John. Both women must walk through a door in obedience to find their place and purpose in God’s kingdom.

The thing I liked most about this book was the everydayness of Mia and Rania’s lives. Yes, life in Sudan is very different from my cushy life in the US, but I could easily relate to Mia’s challenge of raising her family and Rania’s desire to know the truth and also be a respectful and dutiful daughter. Door to Freedom shows the positives of the Muslim culture — family closeness and generous hospitality — but also the lies that bind believers leaving them with only a faint hope of what Allah wills for their lives. Mia finds that dependence on God’s Word is critical for her life in Sudan — a good reminder for all believers everywhere. As she and her husband Michael become more immersed in the Bible and prayer, Mia finds herself astounded — “‘It’s just we pray and pray, but I forget that God may actually do what we ask.'” (p.97). This statement spoke volumes to my heart.

Door to Freedom may be a departure for you if you usually read historical romance or romantic suspense, but it will definitely open your eyes and your heart to needs in this big world of ours.

Recommended.

Audience: older teens to adults.

To purchase this book, click HERE.

(Thanks to LitFuse and New Hope Publishers for a complimentary copy. All opinions expressed are mine alone.)

 

Top 10 Tuesday — Books for The Mission-Minded

12 Apr

 

Thanks so much to the folks at The Broke And The Bookish who every week bring us Top 10 Tuesday. This week’s theme is 10 Books Every X Should Read. To find out what other bloggers are suggesting, click HERE.

toptentuesday

I wasn’t going to participate this week, but after attending a dinner last night where two women, one a newly returned missionary and one a new missionary about to embark on an exciting journey with God, shared their hearts, I thought that there may be others whose passion is missions. All but one of the books on my list are fiction, but are inspired by people and places where the Gospel of Christ is being shared. If you know of other books that should be added, please let me know.

Top 7 Books for The Missions-Minded

 

 UnknownThe City of Tranquil Life by Bo Caldwell — Will Kiehn is seemingly destined for life as a humble farmer in the Midwest when, having felt a call from God, he travels to the vast North China Plain in the early twentieth-century. There he is surprised by love and weds a strong and determined fellow missionary, Katherine. They soon find themselves witnesses to the crumbling of a more than two-thousand-year-old dynasty that plunges the country into decades of civil war. As the couple works to improve the lives of the people of Kuang P’ing Ch’eng– City of Tranquil Light, a place they come to love–and face incredible hardship, will their faith and relationship be enough to sustain them?

Told through Will and Katherine’s alternating viewpoints–and inspired by the lives of the author’s maternal grandparents–City of Tranquil Light is a tender and elegiac portrait of a young marriage set against the backdrop of the shifting face of a beautiful but torn nation. A deeply spiritual book, it shows how those who work to teach others often have the most to learn, and is further evidence that Bo Caldwell writes “vividly and with great historical perspective” (San Jose Mercury News).

412060Farewell, Four Waters by Kate McCordAll she needed were stamps and signatures. Marie and her translator stood in the government offices in Kabul, Afghanistan to complete the paperwork for her new literacy project. The women in her home town, the northern village of Shehktan, would learn to read.

But a spattering of gun shots exploded and an aid worker crumpled. Executed. On the streets of Kabul. Just blocks from the guesthouse. Sending shockwaves through the community.

The foreign personnel assessed their options and some, including Marie’s closest friend, Carolyn, chose to leave the country. Marie and others faced the cost and elected to press forward. But the execution of the lone aid worker was just the beginning.

When she returned home to her Afghan friends in Shehktan to begin classes, she felt eyes watching her, piercing through her scarf as she walked the streets lined in mud brick walls.

And in the end . . .

It took only 14 days for her project, her Afghan home, her community – all of it – to evaporate in an eruption of dust, grief, and loss. Betrayed by someone she trusted. Caught in a feud she knew nothing about, and having loved people on both sides, Marie struggled for the answer: How could God be present here, working here, in the soul of Afghanistan?

Unknown-1Jungle Sunrise by Jonathan Williams — A unique and captivating novel by a member of the Xtreme Team, who risk their lives and endure unthinkable physical deprivation while assisting native people in the most remote areas of the world. This novel has been written out of the rich background of that experience. It is evident the author has been there! He unlocks the secret of how to begin life anew, as the book’s central character moves from a depressing, directionless life to a rewarding and incomparable adventure, discovering the ultimate meaning in life through trials and tragedy. One warning: do not start reading until you have some time because you won’t put it down.

517owNW3fgL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_More Than Conquerors by Kathi Macias True love ignites their passionate pursuit of His call. With violent crime on the rise and the political climate changing throughout certain parts of Mexico, the opportunity for open Christian witness, particularly in some areas of Chiapas State, is rapidly decreasing. Hector Rodriguez pastors a small church in the tourist-popular border town of Tijuana. He also routinely carries Bibles deeper into the hostile areas of Mexico, where he ministers despite increasing difficulty and persecution. Hectors mother accompanied him on one of those trips and felt God called her to stay in the little village of San Juan Chamula, where she uses the Scriptures to teach reading to the families who are open to it.

img240014b28699d1c4f7Red Ink by Kathi Macias A young Chinese woman, Zhen-Li raised to observe the party line, including its one-child-per-family doctrine falls in love with and marries a Christian, and adopts his faith. Though the couple downplays their Christianity in an effort to survive, Zhen-Li’s family is appalled, and she and her husband are ostracized. When she becomes pregnant for the second time and refuses to have an abortion, the persecution begins in earnest. Zhen-Li’s parents, under pressure from the government, pay to have Zhen-Li kidnapped and the baby aborted. It is then Zhen-Li decides she must live up to her name Truth and take a firm stand for her faith, regardless of the consequences, and so she begins to regularly teach children about Zhu Yesu Lord Jesus and to distribute Christian literature every chance she gets. Based loosely on the life of Christian magazine editor Li Ying, currently serving a ten-year prison sentence in China, the story of Yang Zhen-Li tells the desperate tale of her incarceration and separation from her family, as she continues to minister to other prisoners, and even to her guards.

sidebyside300dpi-662x1024Side by Side by Jana Kelley — In the dusty, Islamic country of Sudan, Mia’s life collides with that of another young woman.
A young Christian American mother, Mia finds more than one dark secret on the streets of Khartoum. She finds Halimah, a young, upper-class Arab student with a bright future in her family’s business whose risky and secretive decision has put her life in danger. What happens when the path of a young mother intersects with that of a spunky Sudanese student? God transforms them both . . . forever.

Part of New Hope® Publishers’ contemporary missional fiction line, Side by Side opens the reader’s eyes to the life of Muslims in Sudan as well as some of the struggles that Christians face when living under Islamic law. The reader will be inspired to pray for those who are persecuted for their faith as well as pray for the salvation of those who persecute.

51snqrtf3gl-_sx342_bo1204203200_Why God Calls Us to Dangerous Places by Kate McCordSoon after 9/11, Kate McCord left the corporate world and followed God to Afghanistan —sometimes into the reach of death. Alive but not unscathed, she has suffered the loss of many things: comfort, safety, even dear friends and fellow sojourners.

But Kate realizes that those who go are not the only ones who suffer. Those who love those who go also suffer. This book is for them, too.

Weaving together Scripture, her story, and stories of both those who go and those who send, Kate considers why God calls us to dangerous places and what it means for all involved.

It means dependence. It means loss. It means a firmer hold on hope. It can mean death, trauma, and heavy sorrow. But it can also mean joy unimaginable. Through suffering, we come closer to the heart of God.

Written with the weight of glory in the shadow of loss, Why God Calls Us to Dangerous Places will inspire Christians to count the cost — and pay it.

What books have you read that reveal a heart for missions?

 

 

Book Review: Side by Side

6 May

Sometimes you were publicly exposed to insult and persecution; at other times you stood side by side with those who were so treated. Hebrews 32:33

SidebySide300dpi-662x1024In the dusty, Islamic country of Sudan, Mia’s life collides with that of another young woman.
A young Christian American mother, Mia finds more than one dark secret on the streets of Khartoum. She finds Halimah, a young, upper-class Arab student with a bright future in her family’s business whose risky and secretive decision has put her life in danger. What happens when the path of a young mother intersects with that of a spunky Sudanese student? God transforms them both . . . forever.

Part of New Hope® Publishers’ contemporary missional fiction line, Side by Side opens the reader’s eyes to the life of Muslims in Sudan as well as some of the struggles that Christians face when living under Islamic law. The reader will be inspired to pray for those who are persecuted for their faith as well as pray for the salvation of those who persecute.

 

JKelley-299Jana Kelley is a Texan who hardly ever lives in Texas. Raised in Southeast Asia, Jana developed a love for cross-cultural living early in life. Her love for writing came soon after. Jana returned to Texas to attend college. She and her husband married a month after she graduated and by their second anniversary, they were living in a remote African town. Together with her husband and three boys, Jana enjoys travel and overseas living. After thirteen years in Africa and the Middle East, Jana and her family moved to Southeast Asia where they currently live.

 

My Impressions:

Mission-focused books can be some of the best reads. Inspired by real events and her experience on the mission field, Jana Kelley has created an insightful, moving and suspenseful novel that depicts the realities of life in an Islamic country. The reader gets it all in Side by Side — the sights and sounds of life in an exotic locale, the struggle to live as a foreigner in a country so alien from our own, and the spiritual oppression that hangs over the people. Main character Mia often wonders if Sudan is worth uprooting her family and living a life that is often lonely. At the end she and the reader know Sudan may not be worth it, but Jesus certainly is.

Mia and Michael have always dreamed of living in a foreign country to serve others and share the love of Christ. When they get their chance to move to Sudan, they are excited. But day to day life takes a toll on Mia. Her days are spent mostly in her home taking care of the kids, while Michael lives a life of excitement, making a difference. At least that is what she thinks. Halimah is a university student who attempts to be a good daughter in her Muslim family. But her life is transformed by the Injil, the New Testament, that she secretly reads. But becoming a Christian is not only illegal but could cost her life.

Side by Side has a great combination of setting, characters and plot. The dusty streets, crowded markets and the exotic scents became real as I read. I certainly identified with Mia as she fought feelings of loneliness, inadequacy and doubt. She gave me greater insight into what aid workers and missionaries experience when they leave their families and familiar surroundings behind. Halimah was truly inspiring as she gave up everything for her new found faith in Jesus. Their stories kept me turning the pages; the element of suspense making me hold my breath.

The novel is eye-opening on so many levels — the very real spiritual battle that Christians face, the oftentimes barbaric treatment of women in northern Africa and the Middle East, and the miraculous working of God. I highly recommend Side by Side.

Highly Recommended.

Great for Book Clubs.

Audience: older teens to adults. 

To purchase this book, click HERE

(Thanks to New Hope Publishers and LitFuse for a review copy. All opinions expressed are mine alone.)

 

Author, Author! — Jay and Beth Loecken

18 Aug

One Family. One Purpose. One Passion.

Passion to Action is one ordinary family’s tale of pursuing an extraordinary dream. It’s a story about asking big questions, seeking answers every day, and along the way discovering a big faith.

What happens if you make a dramatic change? How does God sustain you in your new life? What will the people around you say? Find out for yourself what happens while reading about the journey of Jay and Beth Loecken. See just how far God takes them in their desire simply to serve -as a family- in soup kitchens, community projects, and churches across America.

Through the story of the Loeckens, see how God leads us to places we’d never imagine, be inspired to better live from your life’s passion, and find the courage to turn it to action.

Passion to Action: How God Uses Ordinary People in Extraordinary Ways by Jay and Beth Loecken

Guideposts Books/September 2011

ISBN: 978-0-8249-4857-3/256 pages/hardcover/$19.99

(From The Passion To Action website)

Beth and Jay Loecken and family — 

Our dream of hitting the open road and traveling the country in an RV began in the early years of our marriage. With the busyness of life, our dream never became a reality.  In July 2007, our family had the privilege of going to Africa on a life changing mission trip. When we returned, we wept as we realized all that we had in comparison to the African people. Our country host, Paul, shared his powerful testimony of growing up in the slums. As he spoke about the importance of having a dream, we realized that we had let our dream die. We decided to earnestly seek God to see if this dream was from Him. Over several months, God spoke to us through prayer and His word and we believe He has truly led us on this adventure. Read more about how we decided to travel full-time by clicking here.

**************************

While in Atlanta at the ICRS, I had the opportunity to sit down with Jay and Beth and talk to them about their ministry, book and future plans.  Here are some of the highlights:

BTB:  How scary was is it to sell everything and head out on the road?

Jay and Beth:  It wasn’t so much scary as it was exhilarating!   And though it was huge to let go of the security of a job and home, we know that God has us in His hand.  The more we step out, the easier it is to trust God.

BTB:  What do you miss most while on the road?

Jay and Beth:  We spent some time staying in a friend’s house and discovered some of the things we didn’t know we missed — having more than one toilet, privacy, sleeping in or staying up late.  (When you have a family of 6 living in an RV, everyone goes to bed and gets up at the same time.)  But we are so grateful to get to do what we are doing.

BTB:  Where do you see yourself in 5 years?  Still on the road?

Jay and Beth:  We hope to have a ministry center in Denver that can serve as a home base for us and a place for others to come to study and grow.  Our dream is to have an old fire house — enough room for groups to come in and for us to park the RV.  We still see ourselves traveling and ministering all over the country.  In the short term we are working on a small group study that we will self-publish. The study will emphasize community development principles, joining hands in service and service with dignity.

A Big Thank you to Jay and Beth, a couple with real passion that translated itself into action!

(I received an ARC of Passion to Action from B&B Media Group.)