Tag Archives: historical romance fiction

Top 10 Tuesday — Bookish Baby Names

22 May

Do you ever click on the FB links that promise adorable, unique, vintage, or clever baby names. Yeah, me neither 😉 . Well, maybe sometimes, once in a while, always. I love those click-bait posts and always hope for the best. This week Top 10 Tuesday is talking bookish names, so I came up with my top picks for baby names you just have to use. Most are very unusual and won’t occur ten times on your kids class roll. I have tried to find the meaning of each name; in some cases it is very subjective. Let me know what you think of my picks.

Make sure to head over to That Artsy Reader Girl to discover more great bookish names.

 

Top 10 Names You Need To Give Your Baby!

Girls

Adisa (the clear one) from A Time to Stand by Robert Whitlow

Anniston (resurrection) from How Sweet The Sound by Amy K. Sorrells

Aurelie (golden) from Lady Jane Disappears by Joanna Politano Davidson

Fairlight (the fair light of Christ) from Christy by Catherine Marshall

Isola (island) from The Guernsey Literary And Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows

Kaine (tribute) from The House on Foster Hill by Jaime Jo Wright

Keturah (fragrance or sacrifice) from Keturah by Lisa T. Bergren

Pearl (gem of the sea) from A Cup of Dust by Susie Finkbeiner

Persomi (no meaning found) from Child of The River by Irma Joubert

Vienne (life) from A Refuge Assured by Jocelyn Green

 

Boys

Ace (unity) from Out of Circulation by Heather Day Gilbert

Aldric (wise ruler) from A Loyal Heart by Jody Hedlund

Boone (blessing) from Beneath Copper Falls by Colleen Coble (Boone is the name of my niece’s youngest son)

Dawsey (sweet or pleasant) from The Guernsey Literary And Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows

Noble (illustrious) from Lead Me Home by Amy K. Sorrells

Qwill (scribe)  from Gathering The Threads by Cindy Woodsmall

Race (clean shaven) from Ghost Heart by Lisa Harris and Lynne Gentry

Roman (a citizen of Rome) from The Masterpiece by Francine Rivers

Ryland (island meadow) from Life on The Porcelain Edge by C. E. Hilbert

Zane (gift from God) from Undercut by Heather Day Gilbert

 

Which one would you choose for your baby?

 

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Book Review (+Giveaway!): Together Forever

22 May

About the Book

 

Title: Together Forever, Orphan Train Book 2

Author: Jody Hedlund

Genre: Inspirational historical romance

Release Date: May, 2018

Determined to find her lost younger sister, Marianne Neumann takes a job as a placing agent with the Children’s Aid Society in 1858 New York. She not only hopes to offer children a better life, but prays she’ll be able to discover whether Sophie ended up leaving the city on an orphan train so they can finally be reunited.

Andrew Brady, her fellow agent on her first placing-out trip, is a former schoolteacher who has an easy way with the children, firm but tender and friendly. Underneath his charm and handsome looks, though, seems to linger a grief that won’t go away–and a secret from his past that he keeps hidden.

As the two team up, placing orphans in the small railroad towns of Illinois, they find themselves growing ever closer . . . until a shocking tragedy threatens to upend all their work and change one of their lives forever.

 


 

About the Author

Jody hedlundJody Hedlund is the author of over a dozen novels, including Love Unexpected, Captured by Love, Unending Devotion, The Preacher’s Bride, and A Noble Groom, winner of the 2014 Carol Award for historical romance. She received a bachelor’s degree from Taylor University and a master’s from the University of Wisconsin, both in social work. She lives in Michigan with her husband and five children. She loves hearing from readers on Facebook and on her blog at www.jodyhedlund.com.

 

 

 

Guest Post from Jody Hedlund

30,000 Abandoned Children

By Jody Hedlund

Imagine a city where 30,000 abandoned and homeless children live on the streets.

Sounds like something from a futuristic dystopian novel, doesn’t it? Or something that might happen after a war or apocalypse or major disaster, right?

This exact thing actually happened in the 1850’s. And the city was New York City.

It’s hard to believe, but an estimated 30,000 homeless children roamed the dirty city streets and alleys of New York City.

30,000. Children. Let that sink in for a minute. That’s the size of a town.

Historians look back on that time and try to make sense what led to such horrific conditions for children. Of course, the influx of immigrants was at an all time high. Jobs and housing were scarce. Diseases were rampant. Hunger and poverty became a norm. (Orphan Train Depot)

Together forever 1Together forever 2

As more and more people became aware of the enormous problem within the crowded slums, courageous heroes rose up and attempted to do their part to make a difference.

While we may not always agree with the methods that were used to save the thousands of homeless children, we can admire the men and women who could no longer sit idly by.

The Children’s Aid Society was started by Charles Loring Brace as one such attempt to help the hordes of homeless children. His “Emigration Plan” is better known today by the term “Orphan Trains.”

Together forever 3Together Forever

My latest series tackles various elements of the orphan train movement. Together Forever, releasing in May, highlights the placing agents, those devoted people who rode the trains with the orphans. The agents spent weeks and months on the road caring for the children, all the while trying to place them in loving homes.

(If you’d like to try out the series, start with my FREE novella, An Awakened Heart.)

Like the brave men and women who came before us, may we always strive to do our part to make a difference!

My Impressions:

Together Forever returns the reader to Jody Hedlund’s excellent Orphan Train series. This second novel featuring Marianne Neumann is my favorite so far. The characters are realistic in their struggles with guilt, self-worth, and forgiveness. Marianne, Drew, and the orphans they accompany to a new life must face the past while looking to a hopeful future. The historical setting of America in 1858 was vividly drawn. I could feel the sway of the train cars and experience small town land farm life in the newly settled West.  And the story kept me turning the pages. There was adventure, mystery, suspense, history, and romance plenty — something for everyone! And the romance, well it is sizzling sweet — fans will revel in Marianne and Drew’s journey towards happiness. As always, Hedlund weaves a faith thread throughout Together Forever. Acceptance, peace and provision are God’s gifts to the characters (and to readers!).

I loved Together Forever and am impatiently waiting on the third installment, Searching for You, which will focus on the third Neumann sister.

Recommended.

Audience: adults.

(Thanks to Celebrate Lit for a complimentary copy. All opinions expressed are mine alone.)

 

Blog Stops

By The Book, May 22

Pink Granny’s Journey, May 22

Blogging With Carol, May 22

ansel book blog, May 22

Reflections From My Bookshelves, May 23

Moments Dipped in Ink, May 23

Genesis 5020, May 23

Blossoms and Blessings, May 23

Reading Is My SuperPower, May 24

Chas Ray’s Book Nerd Corner, May 24

D’S QUILTS & BOOKS, May 24

Christian Bookaholic, May 24

Just the Write Escape, May 25

Among the Reads, May 25

The Power of Words, May 25

Debbie’s Dusty Deliberations, May 25

Radiant Light, May 26

The Christian Fiction Girl, May 26

The Avid Reader, May 26

Janices book reviews, May 26

Daysong Reflections, May 27

Mary Hake, May 27

Carpe Diem, May 27

Jeanette’s Thoughts, May 27

Kathleen Denly, May 28

History, Mystery & Faith, May 28

A Baker’s Perspective, May 28

Simple Harvest Reads, May 28 (Guest Post from Mindy Houng)

Faithfully Bookish, May 29

God’s Little Bookworm, May 29

Christian Chick’s Thoughts, May 29

Cover to Cover and Everything in Between, May 30

Neverending Stories, May 30

Maureen’s Musing, May 30

Bigreadersite, May 30

Inklings and notions, May 31

To Everything A Season, May 31

Two Points of Interest, May 31

Christian Author, J.E.Grace, May 31

Have A Wonderful Day, June 1

Lighthouse Academy, June 1

Godly Book Reviews, June 1

Red Headed Book Lady, June 2

For the Love of Books, June 2

Vicky Sluiter, June 2

proud to be an autism mom, June 3

Bibliophile Reviews, June 3

Texas Book-aholic, June 3

Connie’s History Classroom, June 4

Pause for Tales, June 4

Book Bites, Bee Stings, & Butterfly Kisses, June 4

Reader’s cozy corner, June 4

Giveaway

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To celebrate her tour, Jody is giving away a grand prize of a $25 Amazon gift card!!

Click below to enter: https://promosimple.com/ps/cee5/together-forever-celebration-tour-giveaway

Audiobook Review: A Refuge Assured

16 May

Lacemaker Vivienne Rivard never imagined her craft could threaten her life. Yet in revolutionary France, it is a death sentence when the nobility, and those associated with them, are forced to the guillotine. Vivienne flees to Philadelphia but finds the same dangers lurking in the French Quarter, as revolutionary sympathizers threaten the life of a young boy left in her care, who some suspect to be the Dauphin. Can the French settlement, Azilum, offer permanent refuge?

Militiaman Liam Delaney proudly served in the American Revolution, but now that the new government has imposed an oppressive tax that impacts his family, he barely recognizes the democracy he fought for. He wants only to cultivate the land of his hard-won farm near Azilum, but soon finds himself drawn into the escalating tension of the Whiskey Rebellion. When he meets a beautiful young Frenchwoman recently arrived from Paris, they will be drawn together in surprising ways to fight for the peace and safety for which they long.

 

Jocelyn Green is a former journalist who puts her investigative skills to work in writing both nonfiction and historical fiction to inspire faith and courage.

The honors her books have received include the Christy Award in historical fiction, and gold medals from the Military Writers Society of America and the Advanced Writers and Speakers Association.

Complex and nuanced characters, rich historical detail and twisting plots make her novels immersive experiences. Her fiction has been praised by Historical Novel Society, Romantic Times, Library Journal, historians specializing in her novels’ time periods, as well as popular and acclaimed authors Laura Frantz, Lori Benton, Jody Hedlund, Sarah Sundin, Joanne Bischof, Julie Lessman, and more.

Jocelyn loves Broadway musicals, the color red, Toblerone chocolate bars, Mexican food, and well-done documentaries. She lives in Iowa with her husband, two children, and two cats she should have named Catticus Finch and Purrman Meowville.

Visit her at jocelyngreen.com, and receive a free gift when joining her e-newsletter mailing list at jocelyngreen.com/subscribe.

 

My Impressions:

Jocelyn Green has done it again! She’s created an historical romance that is not just fluff, but an intriguing look into a bygone era. A Refuge Assured swept me into the life of Vivienne Rivard, a lacemaker displaced by the fanaticism of the French Revolution. With her livelihood gone and the world gone mad, Vivienne makes her way to America to start a new life free from the terrors of Paris. But safety is never assured when revolutionaries abound even in Philadelphia.

A Refuge Assured has a lot going for it. I loved, loved, loved the characters that became so very real in my imagination. Vivienne is a woman of faith and boldness. She embraces her new country and looks for opportunities to thrive. Liam Delaney, the Irish-born  Revolutionary War veteran, is passionate about his country’s liberty and is a determined protector of the vulnerable. The two have a chemistry that fans of romance novels will love. Secondary characters are vividly portrayed and add greatly to the story. But it is the history that captured my attention. Green’s excellent portrayal of the late 1700s of Paris and Pennsylvania reveals exhaustive research on the author’s part. I was never a fan of early American history during my school days, but Green made me want to dust off the history books to find out more about our fledgling country’s struggle to live up to the ideals set forth by the founders. I know history buffs will love her attention to detail. Many of the characters struggle with the true meaning of liberty and freedom, giving this modern reader something to think about. I listened to the audiobook version of A Refuge Assured and was very pleased with the narrator’s skill in giving each character his or her own voice.

A Refuge Assured is unputdownable or, in my case, unturnoffable! 😉 It is a beautifully written novel filled with unforgettable characters and a story that is timeless. It is definitely a highly recommended read!

Highly Recommended.

Audience: adults.

To purchase, click HERE.

(I purchased the audiobook from Audible. All opinions expressed are mine alone.)

 

Top 10 Tuesday — Cover Love

8 May

Favorite color is the theme of Top 10 Tuesday this week, either in title or cover. While looking at covers, I found so many lovely gowns in a rainbow of colors that I couldn’t resist featuring them. So this post goes in a slightly different direction, but don’t you love the dresses featured on these historical romances?! Make sure you visit That Artsy Reader Girl to discover the color favorites of other bloggers.

All The Pretty Dresses!

 

 

Which cover is your favorite?

Book Review (+Giveaway!): Presumption And Partiality

7 May

About the Book

Title: Presumption and Partiality

Author: Rebekah Jones

Genre: Historical Christian Fiction

Release Date: November 27, 2017

Among the cotton fields and farmland of Gilbert, Arizona in the early years of the Great Depression, Mr. and Mrs. Bailey live a simple, but happy life with their five daughters on a cotton farm. When the wealthy Richard Buchanan moves to town, bringing his family, a friend, and a desire to learn about cotton, Matilda Bailey is convinced that he is the perfect candidate to marry her eldest daughter, Alice.

Richard is cheerful, friendly, and likable. His friend Sidney Dennison doesn’t make such a good impression. Eloise Bailey decides he’s arrogant and self-conceited, but when Raymond Wolfe comes to town, accusing Sidney of dishonorable and treacherous conduct, Eloise is angered at the injustice of the situation.

When the Buchanan household leaves town, Alice must turn to the Lord and face, perhaps, her most difficult test in trust, while Eloise takes a trip to visit her friend and may well discover a web of deceit that she doesn’t really want to believe exists.

Click HERE to purchase your copy.

About the Author

Rebekah Jones is first and foremost a follower of the Living God. She started writing as a little girl, seeking to glorify her King with her books and stories. Her goal is to write Bible-Centered, Christian Literature; books rich with interesting characters, intricate story lines, and always with the Word of God at the center. Besides writing, she is an avid reader, songwriter, pianist, singer, artist, and history student. She also loves children. She lives with her family in the Southwestern desert.

Guest Post from Rebekah Jones

Why is he a Navajo?

I’ve had more than one person ask me why I chose to make Sidney Dennison, the “Mr. Darcy” of my novel Presumption and Partiality, a Navajo Indian.

When I commenced planning and research for placing a retelling of Pride and Prejudice in the 1930’s United States, I found myself drawn to the desert of Arizona rather early on. Specifically, the tiny farm town of Gilbert. I knew, however, that few rich people lived in that area; certainly not enough to create social rifts large enough to recreate the social differences of the original novel.

I experimented in my head with a few different ideas, but the idea of Sidney as a Native American came to me one day and just clicked. I knew that I couldn’t fully pull off a Navajo who lived on the reservations. As much as I researched, I couldn’t quite get the feel. Yet, a man whose ancestry included a white man as a grandfather, who lived outside the reservations, though with relatives who clung to some of the old traditions, I thought I could do.

I used to wish I were an Indian, in part because I wanted to have great tracking skills, live in a tee-pee, possess superb bow and arrow abilities, and I wanted to ride a horse. True, most of that did not enter a 1930’s novel, despite my Navajo cowboy, because the eras are different. Though, Sidney did get a horse. Or technically, several.

Further, something about the silent, good-looking Indian appealed to me, much as I tend to shy away from writing about handsome and beautiful people, since they feel so common in fiction. The minute I began imagining the man with his Navajo ancestry, he just felt perfect.

By the end, Sidney turned out to be one of my favorite characters. (I can’t ever pick just one in my novels.) I think I made a good choice and I hope my readers will agree!

My Impressions:

For fans of Jane Austen, particularly Pride And Prejudice, Presumption And Partiality will make a welcome addition to their libraries. This retelling of the beloved Austen classic follows closely to the original story, yet has its own unique twist. The setting is Depression-era Arizona and the Bailey family is the center of the story. As with the original, this novel has all the twists and turns and family meddling in the love lives of Alice (Jane) and Richard (Bingley) and Eloise (Elizabeth) and Sidney (Mr. Darcy). Jones presents her own fresh voice through the addition of historical details, the introduction of the Navajo-angle, and the tweaking of some of the characters. The Wolfe/Wickham character is despicable, but there is some reformation presented. Other secondary characters follow the Austen formula, but are not so over-the-top as in the original. Presumption And Partiality presents a strong faith message — the characters’ lives reflect a dedication to God through prayer, worship, and service to others. This element will appeal to inspirational fiction fans.

Overall, I liked Presumption And Partiality and look forward to reading other volumes in the Vintage Jane Austen collection.

Recommended.

Audience: older teens and adults.

(Thanks to Celebrate Lit for a complimentary copy. All opinions expressed are mine alone.)

 

Blog Stops

Texas Book-aholic, April 24

red headed book lady, April 24

Reading Is My SuperPower, April 25

Seasons of Opportunities, April 25

Karen Sue Hadley, April 25

Just the Write Escape, April 26

Remembrancy, April 26

Two Points of Interest, April 27

Views from the Window Friend, April 27

margaret kazmierczak, April 27

Bibliophile Reviews, April 28

Inklings and notions, April 28

History, Mystery & Faith, April 29

Mary Hake, April 29

proud to be an autism mom, April 30

A Greater Yes, April 30

Fiction Aficionado, April 30

Among the Reads, May 1

Debbie’s Dusty Deliberations, May 1

Janices book reviews, May 2

Jeanette’s Thoughts, May 2

Carpe Diem, May 3

A Baker’s Perspective, May 3

Kaylee’s Kind Of Writes, May 4

With a Joyful Noise, May 4

Have A Wonderful Day, May 4

Pause for Tales, May 5

Simple Harvest Reads, May 5 (Guest post from Mindy Houng)

Pursuing Stacie , May 6

Bigreadersite, May 6

Faery Tales Are Real, May 7

By The Book, May 7

Reader’s Cozy Corner, May 7

 

Giveaway

To celebrate her tour, Rebekah is giving away a grand prize of the complete set of the Vintage Jane Austen Collection!!

Click the link below to enter. Be sure to comment on this post before you enter to claim 9 extra entries!

https://promosimple.com/ps/cc8f

 

First Line Friday — Presumption And Partiality

4 May

I love Austen variations! So today I am sharing volume 5 in the Vintage Jane Austen collection, Presumption and Partiality by Rebekah Jones. This novel is a retelling of Pride and Prejudice, but set in Depression-era Arizona. If you are a fan of Austen, especially P&P, check it out! But first, comment with the first line of the book closest to you. Happy Friday!

 

Make sure to visit Hoarding Books to check out other great first lines. It is a wonderful way to discover new authors and books.

 

Among the cotton fields and farmland of Gilbert, Arizona in the early years of the Great Depression, Mr. and Mrs. Bailey live a simple, but happy life with their five daughters on a cotton farm. When the wealthy Richard Buchanan moves to town, bringing his family, a friend, and a desire to learn about cotton, Matilda Bailey is convinced that he is the perfect candidate to marry her eldest daughter, Alice. Richard is cheerful, friendly, and likable. His friend Sidney Dennison doesn’t make such a good impression. Eloise Bailey decides he’s arrogant and self-conceited, but when Raymond Wolfe comes to town, accusing Sidney of dishonorable and treacherous conduct, Eloise is angered at the injustice of the situation. When the Buchanan household leaves town, Alice must turn to the Lord and face, perhaps, her most difficult test in trust, while Eloise takes a trip to visit her friend and may well discover a web of deceit that she doesn’t really want to believe exists.

Rebekah Jones is a mystery author, as well as the writer of children’s books. She is a born again Christian and works to let her books reflect her worldview. Besides being an avid reader, she is also a songwriter, pianist, artist, and history student, as well as a homemaker-in-training. She lives with her family in the Southwestern Desert.

 

2018 Inspy Shortlists!

2 May

The Inspy Awards, the blogger-based awards program for inspirational books, has announced their 2018 shortlists. Whew! What a great bunch of books! Now it’s in the judges hands, and what a tough job they have. Congrats to all the authors! For more info, check out inspy.com.

 

Contemporary Romance/Romantic Suspense

A New Shade of Summer (Waterfall Press) by Nicole Deese

Then There Was You (Bellbird Press) by Kara Isaac

Jane of Austin (Waterbrook) by Hillary Manton Lodge

True to You (Bethany House) by Becky Wade

Just Look Up (Tyndale) by Courtney Walsh

 

Debut Fiction

 Still Waters (Firefly Southern Fiction) by Lindsey P. Brackett

Freedom’s Ring (Tyndale) by Heidi Chiavaroli

Count Me In (I21 Publishing House) by Mikal Dawn

Lady Jayne Disappears (Revell) by Joanna Davidson Politano

Stars in the Grass (Shiloh Run Press) by Ann Marie Stewart

 

General Fiction

Perennials (Thomas Nelson) by Julie Cantrell

A Trail of Crumbs: A Novel of the Great Depression (Kregel) by Susie Finkbeiner

Life After (Waterbrook) by Katie Ganshert

The Space Between Words (Thomas Nelson) by Michele Phoenix

The Austen Escape (Thomas Nelson) by Katherine Reay

 

Historical Romance

A Note Yet Unsung (Bethany House) by Tamera Alexander

The Road to Paradise (Waterbrook) by Karen Barnett

Many Sparrows (Waterbrook) by Lori Benton

A Lady in Disguise (Howard) by Sandra Byrd

A Moonbow Night (Revell) by Laura Frantz

 

Literature for Young Adults

The Returning (Tyndale) by Rachelle Dekker

Unraveling (Thomas Nelson) by Sara Ella

For Love and Honor (Zondervan) by Jody Hedlund

The Lost Girl of Astor Street (Blink) by Stephanie Morrill

The Evaporation of Sofi Snow (Thomas Nelson) by Mary Weber

 

Mystery/Thriller

The Enoch Effect (Waterfall Press) by Rick Acker

Death at Thorburn Hall (Bethany House) by Julianna Deering

Crown of Souls (Bethany House) by Ronie Kendig

A Portrait of Vengeance (Thomas Nelson) by Carrie Stuart Parks

Imperfect Justice (Thomas Nelson) by Cara Putman

 

Speculative Fiction

Raging Storm (Harvest House) by Vannetta Chapman

The Divide (Tyndale) by Jolina Petersheim

The Beast of Talesend (Indie) by Kyle Robert Schultz

The Girl Who Could See (Indie) by Kara Swanson

King’s Blood (Bethany House) by Jill Williamson

 

Top Ten Tuesday — Highly Anticipated Books!

1 May

This week’s TTT theme is Books I’d Slay A Lion to Get Early. Well . . . I am definitely a book fanatic fan, but not sure I would do bodily harm to anything to get my hands on a coveted book. That’s mainly because I still have a huge stack of unread books from the last list of highly anticipated reads. I have all intentions of reading them, but in the meantime I am content to hold and gaze adoringly at them. LOL! So I will just list ten of the most anticipated books of the next few months.

Make sure to head over to That Artsy Reader Girl to find out what other bloggers are willing to risk mayhem to acquire.

10 Highly Anticipated Novels of June, July, and August 2018

Before I Saw You by Amy K. Sorrells

Called to Protect by Lynette Eason

The Captured Bride by Michelle Greip

Dead Drift by Dani Pettrey

Formula of Deception by Carrie Stuart Parks

The House at Saltwater Point by Colleen Coble

The Love Letter by Rachel Hauck

Minding The Light by Suzanne Woods Fisher

The Patriot Bride by Kimberly Woodhouse

The Sons of Blackbird Mountain by Joanne Bischof

 

What books are you anticipating?

 

 

First Line Friday — The Weaver’s Daughter

13 Apr

Happy Friday everyone! In honor of Sarah E. Ladd‘s newest novel, The Weaver’s Daughter, releasing this week, I am featuring its first line. From the first book I read by Ladd, she became a go-to author of Regency romance. I can’t wait to dig into this book next month.

Please leave a comment with the first line of the book closest to you, then head over to Hoarding Books for more fun!

Kate’s loyalties bind her to the past. Henry’s loyalties compel him to strive for a better future. In a landscape torn between tradition and vision, can two souls find the strength to overcome their preconceptions? Loyalty has been at the heart of the Dearborne family for as long as Kate can remember, but a war is brewing in their small village, one that has the power to rip families asunder — including her own. As misguided actions are brought to light, she learns how deep her father’s pride and bitterness run, and she begins to wonder if her loyalty is well-placed.Henry Stockton, heir to the Stockton fortune, returns home from three years at war hoping to find a refuge from his haunting memories. Determined to bury the past, he embraces his grandfather’s goals to modernize his family’s wool mill, regardless of the grumblings from the local weavers. When tragedy strikes shortly after his arrival, Henry must sort out the truth from suspicion if he is to protect his family’s livelihood and legacy.Henry has been warned about the Dearborne family. Kate, too, has been advised to stay far away from the Stocktons, but chance meetings continue to bring her to Henry’s side, blurring the jagged lines between loyalty, justice, and truth. Kate ultimately finds herself with the powerful decision that will forever affect her village’s future. As unlikely adversaries, Henry and Kate must come together to find a way to create peace for their families, and their village, and their souls – even if it means risking their hearts in the process.

Sarah E. Ladd has always loved the Regency period — the clothes, the music, the literature and the art. A college trip to England and Scotland confirmed her interest in the time period and gave her idea of what life would’ve looked like in era. It wasn’t until 2010 that Ladd began writing seriously. Shortly after, Ladd released the first book in the Whispers on the Moors series. Book one of the series, The Heiress of Winterwood, was the recipient of the 2011 ACFW Genesis Award for historical romance.

 

 

Book Review: The Pirate Bride

6 Apr

Can a former privateer and a determined heiress find lost treasure in 1725?
 A brand new series for fans of all things related to history, romance, adventure, faith, and family trees.



Pasts Collide in New Orleans when a Treasure Goes Missing
 The last time New Orleans attorney Jean-Luc Valmont saw Maribel Cordoba, a Spanish nobleman’s daughter, she was an eleven-year-old orphan perched in the riggings of his privateering vessel proving herself as the best lookout on his crew. Until the day his infamy caught up with them all and innocent lives were lost. Unsure why he survived but vowing to make something of the chance he was given, Jean-Luc has buried his past life so deep that no living person will ever find it—until a very much alive and very grown up Maribel Cordoba arrives on his doorstep and threatens all he now holds dear. 



Join the adventure as the Daughters of the Mayflower series continues with The Pirate Bride by Kathleen Y’Barbo.



 

RITA and Carol award nominee Kathleen Y’Barbo is the best-selling, award-winning author of more than forty novels, novellas, and young adult books. In all, more than one million copies of her books are currently in print in the US and abroad, and her books have been translated into Dutch, German, and Spanish, to name a few.

Kathleen is a member of American Christian Fiction Writers and Romance Writers of America. She holds a BBA from Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School and a certification in Paralegal Studies, and is a former member of the Texas Bar Association’s Paralegal Division.

A tenth-generation Texan, Kathleen Y’Barbo has four children of her own as well as seven bonus kids she gladly inherited when she married her own hero in combat boots (read about their real-life romance here!). Kathleen is proud to be a military wife, even if it did mean giving up her Texas drivers license.

To connect with her through social media, check out the links on her website at www.kathleenybarbo.com.

 

My Impressions:

Join the adventure on the high seas in the latest book in The Daughters of The Mayflower series, The Pirate Bride. Set on the sparkling blue waters of the Caribbean Sea, the quiet beaches of a remote island, and the busy streets of New Orleans, this novel hits all the right buttons for fans of historical romance — an endearing heroine, a truly heroic (and hunky) hero, and fascinating history of privateers of the early 1700s. This one gets a recommended rating from me.

Maribel Cordoba is just 12 years old when she loses her family and is swept up into intrigue and adventure on a pirate ship. At least she believes the young captain of the Ghost Ship is a pirate. He asserts he is doing the King’s business with Letters of Marque signed by the French government. But whether privateer or pirate, Captain Beaumont is a protector of the vulnerable and determines to take care of the adventure-seeking Maribel. However, a bounty on his head puts all in his care in peril.

I liked a lot of things about The Pirate Bride. Its main character, Maribel, is an engaging (and exasperating) young girl, and only a bit less exasperating as a young woman. She steals the heart of the crew in her brief time on the ship, and steals the heart of the captain years later. Of course the dashing ship’s captain is also a favorite, but the supporting characters add a wonderful dimension as well. The story is lightly told, yet filled with action, intrigue, and danger. Twists and turns and surprises abound. The historical setting is interesting —  I loved the details the author includes to give the novel an authentic feel. Faith in God, with an emphasis on prayer, is naturally woven throughout the book.

As I was reading The Pirate Bride, I thought what a wonderful beach read for fans of historical romance! A quick and fun book, you’ll enjoy this one next to the pool or on a blanket on the beach.

Recommended.

Audience: adults.

To purchase this book, click HERE.

(Thanks to Barbour Publishing for a complimentary copy. All opinions expressed are mine alone.)