Tag Archives: Fiona Veitch Smith

Top 10 Tuesday — Summer TBR

19 Jun

It is definitely summer here in the sunny South. The humidity and temps are up and the bugs are out. But I can’t complain because I have some great summer reading — history, mystery, romance, and suspense all in varying combinations! What about you? What are you reading this summer?

Make sure to check out other bloggers’ summer reading lists at That Artsy Reader Girl.

Top 10 Books on My Summer Reading List

 

Cold, Cold Heart by Christine Poulson

Dead Drift by Dani Pettrey

The Death Beat by Fiona Veitch Smith

Falling for You by Becky Wade

The Linen God by Jim O’Shea

The Love Letter by Rachel Hauck

Murder at The Flamingo by Rachel McMillan

A Rebel Heart by Beth White

The Reckoning at Gossamer Pond by Jaime Jo Wright

Sons of Blackbird Mountain by Joanne Bischof

 

What’s on your Summer TBR?

 

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Top 10 Tuesday: Books for Lovers of British Mysteries (+ A Canadian Cousin)

15 Aug

Top 10 Tuesday is back! Yay! The folks at The Broke And The Bookish had some well-deserved time off, but now they are back with great topics for book lovers. This week I’m talking about book recommendations for lovers of British mysteries. I love a good mystery and have found the following books to meet all the requirements — puzzling cases set in the British Isles. They run the gamut from historical and contemporary, amateur detectives and police procedurals, to urban and bucolic settings. Ironically, a couple of the series, while definitely having a British vibe, are authored by Americans. All are excellent!

Top Book Recommendations for Lovers of British Mysteries

+ A Canadian Cousin

(please note there may be more books in these series than are pictured)

The Aiden Mysteries by Fay Sampson

 

The Blitz Detective by Mike Hollow

 

The Drew Farthering Mysteries by Julianna Deering

 

The Faith Morgan Mysteries by Martha Ockley

 

A Father Gilbert Mystery by Paul McCusker

 

The Monastery Murders by Donna Fletcher Crow

 

A Mystery for D. I. Costello by Elizabeth Flynn

 

Poppy Denby Investigates by Fiona Veitch Smith

 

A Canadian Cousin!

The Herringford And Watts Mysteries by Rachel McMillan

 

What are some of your favorite mysteries?

 

Book Review: The Kill Fee

19 Jan

51p-hv1vxklPoppy Denby, Arts and Entertainment Editor at The Daily Globe, covers an exhibition of Russian Art, hosted by White Russian refugees, including members of the surviving exiled Romanov Royal family. There is an armed robbery, a guard is shot, and the largest Fabergé Egg in the collection is stolen. The egg itself is valuable, but more so are the secrets it contains within – secrets that could threaten major political powers. Suspects are aplenty, including the former keeper of the Fabergé Egg, a Russian Princess called Selena Romanova Yusopova. The interim Bolshevik Russian ambassador, Vasili Safin inserts himself into the investigation, as he believes the egg – and the other treasures – should all be restored to the Russian people. Poppy, her editor Rollo, press photographer Daniel, and the other staff of the Globe are delighted to be once again in the middle of a sensational story. But, soon the investigation takes a dark turn when another body is found and an employee of the newspaper becomes a suspect… The race is on to find both the key and the egg – can they be found before the killer strikes again?

fiona-treeFormerly a journalist, Fiona Veitch Smith is a writer of books, theatre plays and screenplays.

Her children’s picturebooks, the Young David series, are now published by SPCK Publishing. Her adult mystery series set in the 1920s, Poppy Denby Investigates, is published by Lion Fiction.

She is a member of the British Society of Authors and the Association of Christian Writers. Fiona is also the editor of the popular writing advice website The Crafty Writer and her courses attract students from around the world.

She lives with her husband, daughter and two dogs in Newcastle upon Tyne where she lectures in media and scriptwriting at the local universities.

 

My Impressions:

The intrepid Poppy Denby is back in Fiona Veitch Smith’s latest book, The Kill Fee. The newly minted journalist is on the case when priceless Faberge eggs go missing and the bodies start piling up. An historical mystery filled with all the jazz of the Roaring 20s, this novel manages not only to capture the essence of the era, but keep the reader guessing with a well crafted story. For fans of British whodunits, this one is a great choice.

The Kill Fee involves not one, but two mysteries. The stories are told within two separate storylines, and intersect at the end. The Russian revolution is still ongoing and the brutality of the war between the Whites and the Reds spills into London as royal Russian refugees and Bolshevik loyalists clash over the ownership of priceless works of art and fabulous jewels. I very much enjoyed getting a glimpse into what was going on in politics of this time. There are a number of interesting characters and suspects galore. Poppy is again in the middle of the action as she discovers bodies and clues and manages to stay one step ahead of the authorities. While The Kill Fee is really not a Christian novel (as we see it in America), the author’s worldview informs her characters. Poppy calls on God for help at a critical point in the novel, someone she has neglected since arriving in the big city. Her faith, a bit covered with cobwebs, is realistically portrayed.

A fun novel, The Kill Fee kept me guessing and the pages turning as I followed the adventures of Poppy Denby. I’m looking forward to many more exciting times with this series.

Recommended.

Audience: adults.

To purchase this book, click HERE.

(Thanks to Kregel and Lion Hudson for a complimentary copy. All opinions expressed are mine alone.)

Book Review: The Jazz Files

18 Mar

51a67zXF2nL._SX327_BO1,204,203,200_Introducing Poppy Denby, a young journalist in London during the Roaring Twenties, investigating crime in the highest social circles.

It is 1920. Twenty-two year old Poppy Denby moves from Northumberland to live with her paraplegic aunt in London. Aunt Dot, a suffragette who was injured in battles with the police in 1910, is a feisty and well-connected lady.

Poppy has always dreamed of being a journalist, and quickly lands a position as an editorial assistant at the Daily Globe. Then one of the paper’s hacks, Bert Isaacs, dies suddenly and messily. Poppy and photographer Daniel Rokeby (with whom Poppy has an immediate and mutual attraction) begin to wonder if Bert was pushed. His story was going to be the morning lead, but he hasn’t finished writing it. Poppy finds his notes and completes the story, which is a sensation.

The Globe’s editor, realising her valuable suffragette contacts, invites her to dig deeper. Poppy starts sifting through the dead man’s files and unearths a major mystery which takes her to France — and abruptly into danger.

Fiona-treeFormerly a journalist, Fiona Veitch Smith is a writer of books, theatre plays and screenplays.

Her children’s picturebooks, the Young David series, are now published by SPCK Publishing. Her adult mystery series set in the 1920s, Poppy Denby Investigates, is published by Lion Fiction. The first book in the series, The Jazz Files, is available from September 2015.

She is a member of the British Society of Authors and the Association of Christian Writers. Fiona is also the editor of the popular writing advice website The Crafty Writer and her courses attract students from around the world.

She lives with her husband, daughter and two dogs in Newcastle upon Tyne where she lectures in media and scriptwriting at the local universities.

 

My Impressions:

Set in London during the 1920s, The Jazz Files is sure to appeal to fans of the classic era of mystery fiction. Poppy Denby, newly arrived in the city, yearns to become an independent woman. Her natural nosiness and her quest for truth leads her to a job at a newspaper. Her job straightening out the files of the editor soon leads her to a decade old case that becomes very personal. This British whodunit with all the flavor of the Jazz Age will have you guessing along with Poppy as she investigates from London to Paris and back again.

Setting sets the tone of The Jazz Files. The Great War is over — women are more independent, the night life is filled with music, and the old is shaken off. Careful attention to detail, including fashion, entertainment, and the politics of the day, brings London of 1920 to life. Smith takes a few liberties with the timeline (as explained in her Historical Notes) but readers will be quick to overlook those as they become immersed in the twisting mystery Poppy investigates. Poppy is a character to love. A determined young woman, she brings a freshness to the cynical news business. A Christian, she is often confronted with ethical dilemmas in her quest for the truth. Her struggle with means and ends is very realistic and relevant for today. Her questions and doubts about the workings of God are very natural. Supporting characters are equally interesting and do not fall into the stereotypes so common in the mystery genre.

The Jazz Files is a quick and entertaining read, and I am hopeful that Poppy will return soon with more investigations. Please note: The Jazz Files was published in England and contains some language and situations usually not included in American Christian fiction.

Recommended.

Audience: adults.

To purchase this book, click HERE.

(Thanks to Kregel and Lion Hudson for a review copy. All opinions expressed are mine alone.)