Tag Archives: April Henry

Top 10 Tuesday — We Want Justice!

24 Apr

This week the Top 10 Tuesday prompt is frequently used word in the titles of  ____ genre. Well, I quickly scanned my favorite, mystery/suspense, and found that authors do indeed use a few words over and over in their titles. Fatal, Death (not including variations), Murder, and Justice seemed to be the favorites. On this blog alone I’ve reviewed 6 Fatal books, 12 Death books, 20 Murder books, and 9 Justice books (with 3 waiting in the TBR pile!). In an effort to bring a positive spin to this Deadly (7 books!) topic, I went with Justice because though elusive, it is the ultimate goal of the heroes and heroines that inhabit the novels.

Be sure to visit That Artsy Reader Girl to find out what other words frequent bloggers must-read lists.

 

Top Books with Justice in The Title

Beyond Justice by Cara Putman

The Color of Justice by Ace Collins

Dark Justice by Brandilyn Collins

Eyes of Justice by Lis Wiehl and April Henry

Imperfect Justice by Cara Putman

Justice Betrayed by Patricia Bradley

Justice Buried by Patricia Bradley

Justice Delayed by Patricia Bradley

The Justice Game by Randy Singer

Private Justice by Terri Blackstock

Scorned Justice by Margaret Daley

What word frequents your favorite genre?

Audiobook Review: A Deadly Business

19 Aug

549044A prosecutor of violent criminals. A detective on a dangerous beat. When these two pros take on an off-the-books case, the line between professional and personal becomes perilously blurred.

When a twenty-two-year-old convict walks into the courtroom, his eyes confirm what Mia Quinn already guesses: he blames her for his conviction. In seconds, he knocks her to the ground and holds a razor blade to her throat. While she manages to escape without injury, it’s just one more reminder that Mia’s job prosecuting Seattle’s s most dangerous criminals is far from low risk.

As a single mom, the last thing Mia wants is for her work to follow her home or discover that it already has.

Now Detective Charlie Carlson is suggesting the very thing Mia doesn’t want to believe—that her accountant husband’s deadly car accident was no accident at all. When Mia and Charlie encounter resistance to reopening the case, they take the investigation into their own hands. And they find much more than they bargained for.

Was Mia’s husband more than an accountant . . . and less than an honest man? As the truth becomes more shocking and the case grows more complex, her husband’s killers take note of Mia . . . and her children. How far will this prosecutor go to learn the truth about her husband—and how far will she have to go to protect her family?

logoLis Wiehl is one of the nation’s most prominent trial lawyers and highly regarded commentators. Currently, she is the legal analyst and reporter on the Fox News Channel and Bill O’Reilly’s sparring partner in the weekly “Is It Legal?” segment on The O’Reilly Factor. Prior to that she was O’Reilly’s co-host on the nationally syndicated show The Radio Factor. She is also a Professor of Law at New York Law School. Her column “Lis on Law” appears weekly on FoxNews.com.

Prior to joining Fox News Channel in New York City, Wiehl served as a legal analyst and reporter for NBC News and NPR’s All Things Considered. Before that, Wiehl served as a Federal Prosecutor in the United States Attorney’s office.

Wiehl earned her Juris Doctor from Harvard Law School and her Master of Arts in Literature from the University of Queensland.

Wiehl is also the author of The 51% Minority, which won the 2008 award for Books for a Better Life in the motivational category, and Winning Every Time.

She lives with her husband and two children in New York.

about_april_picAbout April Henry:

I write mysteries and thrillers. I live in Portland, Oregon with my family.

When I was 12, I sent a short story about a six-foot tall frog who loved peanut butter to Roald Dahl, the author of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. He took it to lunch and showed it to the editor of an international children’s magazine – and she asked to publish the story! (For no money, which might have been a warning about how hard it is to make a living writing.)

My dream of writing went dormant until I was in my 30s, working at a corporate job, and started writing books on the side. Those first few years are now thankfully a blur. Now I’m very lucky to make a living doing what I love. I have written 13 novels for adults and teens, with more on the way. My books have gotten starred reviews, been picked for Booksense, translated into four languages, been named to state reading lists, and short-listed for the Oregon Book Award. And Face of Betrayal, which I co-wrote with Lis Wiehl, was on the New York Times bestseller list for four weeks.

I also review literary fiction, YA literature, and mysteries and thrillers for the Oregonian, and have written articles for both The Writer and Writers Digest.

In 2012, look for two books: The Night She Disappeared, a teen thriller, and Eyes of Justice, co-written with Lis Wiehl.

My Impressions:

The writing team of Lis Wiehl and April Henry is one of my favorites for creating riveting mystery/suspense novels. I especially like listening to their books during my morning walks. A Deadly Business, the second book in the Mia Quinn Mystery series, is another winner. If you are looking for a fast-paced novel with relatable characters and a complex and twisting plot, check this one out. (Read my review of book 1, A Matter of Trust, HERE.)

Mia Quinn is juggling a lot of things — career, single motherhood — and now threats in and out of the courtroom. Her life just keeps getting more and more complicated. Her boss is pressuring her to make a decision in a controversial case and friend and detective, Charlie Carlson, brings her evidence of foul play in the death of her husband. Add kids and a new romantic interest into the mix and you have a life that threatens to overwhelm.

I liked that the action took off from the opening. Mia is hit on all sides with stress, threats and confusing emotions. Fast-paced is an understatement! But the many plot lines never distract the reader; they just keep you on your toes. There is some unresolved issues at the end, but most of the story is satisfactorily wrapped up. I also really liked the characters in A Deadly Business. These are flawed people trying their hardest to do what is right despite the pressures of life. Do they mess up? Oh yeah. But don’t we all. Their very realness makes them credible.

A Deadly Business is good for all fans of mystery/suspense, and I am looking forward to the next installment in the Mia Quinn Mystery series.

Recommended.

Audience: Adults

(I purchased this audiobook from Audible. All opinions expressed are mine alone.)

Audiobook Review: A Matter of Trust

11 Jul

549037One minute Mia Quinn is in her basement chatting on the phone with a colleague at the prosecutor’s office. The next minute there is a gunshot over the line and Mia must listen in horror as her friend Colleen bleeds to death.

As a new widow with a pile of debt, a troubled teenage son, and a four-year-old who wkaes up screaming at night, she needs more time with her family, not les – and working Colleen’s case will be quite demanding. Besides, she already has her hands full with a horrific case of bullying. But Colleen was her friend and she needs to keep her job. So she reluctantly teams up with detective Charlie Carlson to investigate Colleen’s death. But the deeper they dig the more complications unfold- even the unsettling possibility that someone may be coming after her.

logoLis Wiehl is one of the nation’s most prominent trial lawyers and highly regarded commentators.  Currently, she is the legal analyst and reporter on the Fox News Channel and Bill O’Reilly’s sparring partner in the weekly “Is It Legal?” segment on The O’Reilly Factor. Prior to that she was O’Reilly’s co-host on the nationally syndicated show The Radio Factor.  She is also a Professor of Law at New York Law School.  Her column “Lis on Law” appears weekly on FoxNews.com.

Prior to joining Fox News Channel in New York City, Wiehl served as a legal analyst and reporter for NBC News and NPR’s All Things Considered.  Before that, Wiehl served as a Federal Prosecutor in the United States Attorney’s office.

Wiehl earned her Juris Doctor from Harvard Law School and her Master of Arts in Literature from the University of Queensland.

Wiehl is also the author of The 51% Minority, which won the 2008 award for Books for a Better Life in the motivational category, and Winning Every Time.

She lives with her husband and two children in New York.

about_april_picAbout April Henry:

I write mysteries and thrillers. I live in Portland, Oregon with my family.

When I was 12, I sent a short story about a six-foot tall frog who loved peanut butter to Roald Dahl, the author of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. He took it to lunch and showed it to the editor of an international children’s magazine – and she asked to publish the story! (For no money, which might have been a warning about how hard it is to make a living writing.)

My dream of writing went dormant until I was in my 30s, working at a corporate job, and started writing books on the side. Those first few years are now thankfully a blur. Now I’m very lucky to make a living doing what I love. I have written 13 novels for adults and teens, with more on the way. My books have gotten starred reviews, been picked for Booksense, translated into four languages, been named to state reading lists, and short-listed for the Oregon Book Award. And Face of Betrayal, which I co-wrote with Lis Wiehl, was on the New York Times bestseller list for four weeks.

I also review literary fiction, YA literature, and mysteries and thrillers for the Oregonian, and have written articles for both The Writer and Writers Digest.

In 2012, look for two books: The Night She Disappeared, a teen thriller, and Eyes of Justice, co-written with Lis Wiehl.

My Impressions:

I started listening to audiobooks while walking a few months ago. I have found it keeps me motivated to get out and walk, especially since it has turned hot here in the Deep South. I usually pick books that are quick reads in their book form and the suspense genre generally fits that bill. This past week I was entertained with Lis Wiehl and April Henry’s latest legal suspense novel, A Matter of Trust. I found the quick pace of the book perfect for my walking needs.

Mia Quinn is a widowed mother of two children trying to balance the demands of her job as a Seattle prosecutor and her new status as single mother. Struggling with the financial mess her husband left her, the night terrors that seize her 5 year old daughter and the sullen teenager that seems to have replaced her son, Mia is already exhausted physically and emotionally when she is assigned to help solve the murder of her best friend and co-worker, Colleen. Mia is also determined to find justice for a young man bullied into suicide. On her website, Wiehl states that Mia Quinn is inspired by her own life as a full-time legal professional and single mother.

I found A Matter of Trust to be an intriguing novel full of the kind of puzzling leads and clues that keep a reader wondering and guessing. I had my suspicions as to the killer, but didn’t really know until the murderer exposed himself. I liked the characters of Mia and Charlie Carlson, the lead detective on Colleen’s case — believable and interesting — and look forward to more books in this series. The faith message in A Matter of Trust is secondary, yet important to the development of the characters. I believe it will play a continued role in later books.

So if you like a suspense/mystery involving the justice system, you will want to pick up A Matter of Trust in any of its versions.

Recommended.

(I purchased this book in its audiobook form from Audible. The opinions expressed are mine alone.)

To purchase a copy of A Matter of Trust, click on the image below.

Book Review: Eyes of Justice

25 Sep

Cassidy, Allison, and Nicole fight for justice every day-Cassidy as a crime reporter, Nicole with the FBI, and Allison as a federal prosecutor. Together they’re a Triple Threat to be reckoned with. But never have they faced a case so full of blind alleys – or so painfully close to home. When a devastating turn of events upsets the balance of the Triple Threat team, they discover an ally in a quirky Private Investigator named Ophelia. The women vow not to stop until the case is solved and justice is served.

 

 

Lis Wiehl is one of the nation’s most prominent trial lawyers and highly regarded commentators.  Currently, she is the legal analyst and reporter on the Fox News Channel and Bill O’Reilly’s sparring partner in the weekly “Is It Legal?” segment on The O’Reilly Factor. Prior to that she was O’Reilly’s co-host on the nationally syndicated show The Radio Factor.  She is also a Professor of Law at New York Law School.  Her column “Lis on Law” appears weekly on FoxNews.com.

Prior to joining Fox News Channel in New York City, Wiehl served as a legal analyst and reporter for NBC News and NPR’s All Things Considered.  Before that, Wiehl served as a Federal Prosecutor in the United States Attorney’s office.

Wiehl earned her Juris Doctor from Harvard Law School and her Master of Arts in Literature from the University of Queensland.

Wiehl is also the author of The 51% Minority, which won the 2008 award for Books for a Better Life in the motivational category, and Winning Every Time.

She lives with her husband and two children in New York.

About April Henry:

I write mysteries and thrillers. I live in Portland, Oregon with my family.

When I was 12, I sent a short story about a six-foot tall frog who loved peanut butter to Roald Dahl, the author of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. He took it to lunch and showed it to the editor of an international children’s magazine – and she asked to publish the story! (For no money, which might have been a warning about how hard it is to make a living writing.)

My dream of writing went dormant until I was in my 30s, working at a corporate job, and started writing books on the side. Those first few years are now thankfully a blur. Now I’m very lucky to make a living doing what I love. I have written 13 novels for adults and teens, with more on the way. My books have gotten starred reviews, been picked for Booksense, translated into four languages, been named to state reading lists, and short-listed for the Oregon Book Award. And Face of Betrayal, which I co-wrote with Lis Wiehl, was on the New York Times bestseller list for four weeks.

I also review literary fiction, YA literature, and mysteries and thrillers for the Oregonian, and have written articles for both The Writer and Writers Digest.

In 2012, look for two books: The Night She Disappeared, a teen thriller, andEyes of Justice, co-written with Lis Wiehl.

 

My Impressions:

I think it is pretty risky for an author to kill one of her main characters in the fourth book of a series! But Lis Wiehl and April Henry have done just that in their latest book in the Triple Threat Club series, Eyes of Justice. The reader finds out early on just which of the three main characters is slated for elimination. The remaining two take up the challenge of finding the killer, but appearances are often deceiving as more than one of the characters find out. I found Eyes of Justice a page turner — the suspense and action keep you reading, even when other things beckon (like laundry and ironing!) And while the murder of a main character is shocking, I really liked the new character, Ophelia, that the authors introduced. She is quite complex and I look forward to her role in upcoming books. The two remaining original characters face changes as well. I look forward to their development. So, overall, I really liked Eyes of Justice. And while you could read this book without the others, you really should start with the first book, Face of Betrayal, to get total enjoyment from the series.

 

Recommended.

(I received Eyes of Justice from NetGalley in return for a review. The opinions expressed are mine alone.)

 

 

Book Review: Heart Of Ice

2 Mar

Elizabeth Avery is a stunningly beautiful woman. But her perfectly managed exterior hides the ice cold heart of a killer. She ingeniously manipulates everyone who crosses her path to do exactly as she wishes–from crime reporter Cassidy Shaw, who thinks Elizabeth is her new best friend, to a shy young man Elizabeth persuades to kill for her.

As Elizabeth leaves a trail of bodies in her wake, Federal prosecutor Allison Pierce and FBI agent Nicole Hedges must piece together clues from seemingly unrelated crimes. Can they stop her before she reaches her unthinkable, ultimate end-game?

Lis Wiehl is one of the nation’s most prominent trial lawyers and highly regarded commentators.  Currently, she is the legal analyst and reporter on the Fox News Channel and Bill O’Reilly’s sparring partner in the weekly “Is It Legal?” segment on The O’Reilly Factor. Prior to that she was O’Reilly’s co-host on the nationally syndicated show The Radio Factor.  She is also a Professor of Law at New York Law School.  Her column “Lis on Law” appears weekly on FoxNews.com.

Prior to joining Fox News Channel in New York City, Wiehl served as a legal analyst and reporter for NBC News and NPR’s All Things Considered.  Before that, Wiehl served as a Federal Prosecutor in the United States Attorney’s office.

Wiehl earned her Juris Doctor from Harvard Law School and her Master of Arts in Literature from the University of Queensland.

Wiehl is also the author of The 51% Minority, which won the 2008 award for Books for a Better Life in the motivational category, and Winning Every Time.

She lives with her husband and two children in New York.

About April Henry:

I write mysteries and thrillers. I live in Portland, Oregon with my family.

When I was 12, I sent a short story about a six-foot tall frog who loved peanut butter to Roald Dahl, the author of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. He took it to lunch and showed it to the editor of an international children’s magazine – and she asked to publish the story! (For no money, which might have been a warning about how hard it is to make a living writing.)

My dream of writing went dormant until I was in my 30s, working at a corporate job, and started writing books on the side. Those first few years are now thankfully a blur. Now I’m very lucky to make a living doing what I love. I have written 13 novels for adults and teens, with more on the way. My books have gotten starred reviews, been picked for Booksense, translated into four languages, been named to state reading lists, and short-listed for the Oregon Book Award. And Face of Betrayal, which I co-wrote with Lis Wiehl, was on the New York Times bestseller list for four weeks.

I also review literary fiction, YA literature, and mysteries and thrillers for the Oregonian, and have written articles for both The Writer and Writers Digest.

In 2012, look for two books: The Night She Disappeared, a teen thriller, and Eyes of Justice, co-written with Lis Wiehl.

My Impressions:

Heart of Ice is the third book in the Triple Threat series that my book club has read.  The first two books were really good, but I think this one is my favorite. The Triple Threat series involves three friends that are connected to the crime scene in Portland, Oregon.  Allison is a federal prosecutor, Nicole is an FBI agent and Cassidy is a news reporter assigned to the crime beat.  These characters show the different points of view in the investigation of crime.  And while the characters’ personal lives are part of the story, nothing detracts from the progression of the plot.

In the first two books, the reader, along with the characters try to figure out who the villain is.  Heart of Ice takes another tack — the reader knows from the beginning about the sociopathic killer that has come into the characters’ lives.  I think this adds an added layer of suspense and tension to the novel.  Wiehl and Henry do a great job of getting into the mind of a sociopath.  The results are realistic and chilling.

If you like suspense, try Heart of Ice.  It can be read as a stand alone novel, but I recommend beginning with Face of Betrayal because all the books in this series are excellent.

Highly Recommended.

My book club will be discussing Heart of Ice next week.  We would love to hear your comments!

(Heart of Ice was a personal purchase.)

By The Book’s March Selection — Heart of Ice

10 Feb

Elizabeth Avery is a stunningly beautiful woman. But her perfectly managed exterior hides the ice cold heart of a killer. She ingeniously manipulates everyone who crosses her path to do exactly as she wishes–from crime reporter Cassidy Shaw, who thinks Elizabeth is her new best friend, to a shy young man Elizabeth persuades to kill for her.

As Elizabeth leaves a trail of bodies in her wake, Federal prosecutor Allison Pierce and FBI agent Nicole Hedges must piece together clues from seemingly unrelated crimes. Can they stop her before she reaches her unthinkable, ultimate end-game?