Tag Archives: Ace Collins

Top 10 Tuedsay — New Books in The TBR Pile

8 Nov

Books, books and more books! That’s what my life looks like! I am always on the lookout for my next great read, even when I have 10s 100s 1000s waiting in the wings! This week the folks at The Broke And The Bookish have challenged us to list our most recently added books to the old TBR list. I will limit my list to just 10, although I could probably go on and on. To find out what other bloggers are looking forward to reading, click HERE.

toptentuesday

I think I have a good mix of books to read in the upcoming weeks — history, mystery, romance, Christmas-themed and Indie-published novels. Eclectic, but that’s how I like it.

Top 10 Recently Added Books on The TBR List

 

Another Day, Another Dali by Sandra Orchard

A Christmas to Remember by Linda Brooks Davis

Dressed for Death by Julianna Deering

unknownunknown-1unknown-2

The End of The Roadie by Elizabeth Flynn

Finding Riley by Dan Walsh

Lucifer’s Harvest by Mel Starr

The Most Wonderful Time of The Year by Ace Collins

5138a7hu2ml-_sx331_bo1204203200_unknownunknown-151uw-fw57el-_sx355_bo1204203200_

O Little Town of Bethany by Rene Guttering and Cheryl McKay

The Princes of Albion by Jon and Thomas Hopkins

Truth Be Told by J J Hemmestad

517bw90uerl51ys5wubgjl-_sx346_bo1204203200_51z6gotghwl-_sx311_bo1204203200_

What are some of the books you are reading next?

 

 

Top Ten Tuesday — Best Christmas Novellas

13 Sep

Thanks to the folks at The Broke And The Bookish for hosting Top 10 Tuesday every week. This week’s theme is Favorite Genres. To find out what other bloggers love to read, click HERE.

 

toptentuesday

It’s September and while Pumpkin Everything is popping up, the temperatures here in Middle Georgia are still in the 90s. It may be a bit hot, but when the calendar says it’s Fall, I like to begin my Christmas reading. Every year I look for a Christmas fix in books. Here is a list of some great books to read to get you in the Christmas mood, no matter the date or temperature! I’ve divided them into categories, although there is some crossover, so that you can pick the best for your mood and tastes.

Top Christmas Novellas

 

Historic and Nostalgic Christmas

The Christmas Pony by Melody Carlson

The Christmas Star by Ace Collins

A Wreath of Snow by Liz Curtis Higgs

Remembering Christmas by Daniel Walsh

unknown-1unknown-2unknown-351kbw2xd4pl-_sx321_bo1204203200_

Suspenseful And Mysterious Christmas

Holy Night by Colleen Coble

Silent Night by Colleen Coble

Advent of Murder by Martha Oakley

51bkc20tdvl-_sx324_bo1204203200_511viu5rpflunknown

Romantic Christmas

An Endless Christmas by Cynthia Ruchti

The Christmas Note by Donna VanLiere

The Christmas Promise by Donna VanLiere

The Christmas Secret by Donna VanLiere

unknown51wmzlacnzl-_sx350_bo1204203200_5152ofglopl-_sx329_bo1204203200_516pmixhbl-_sx408_bo1204203200_

Christmas with Dogs And Cats

The Christmas Cat by Melody Carlson

The Christmas Dog by Melody Carlson

518iqzv6ml-_sx322_bo1204203200_51t3gxnsgcl-_sx327_bo1204203200_

Funny Christmas

The Christmas Joy Ride by Melody Carlson

Skipping Christmas by John Grisham

51qfjxkcfzl-_sx321_bo1204203200_41mpsbst04l-_sx312_bo1204203200_

Heartwarming Christmas

A Redbird Christmas by Fanny Flagg

A Christmas Journey Home by Kathi Macias

Unexpected Christmas Hero by Kathi Macias

51k2mambfkl-_sx329_bo1204203200_51nbvpyqhll-_sx322_bo1204203200_513qxgrp49l-_sx331_bo1204203200_

What’s Your Favorite Christmas Book?

 

Book Review: Service Tails

30 Aug

51Xq6jSY-cL._SX322_BO1,204,203,200_Not all heroic dogs wildly toss themselves into lifesaving situations. Some save lives simply by their incredible commitment to duty and service. Some lead the way to independence for people whose disabilities were supposed to limit their lives.

In Service Tails: More Stories of Man’s Best Hero, prolific author Ace Collins introduces us to leaders whose entire lives are wrapped in the banner of service. Their stories are remarkable snapshots of the value of vision and teamwork, as well as devotion to duty and unconditional love and acceptance – stretching the way we see both canine and human potential. Their training was intense, their loyalty unquestioned and each step of the way they constantly adapt to better serve those they lead. These unforgettable dogs are more than heroes; they are models from which we can learn how to love and serve unconditionally.

 

ACollins-382Ace Collins defines himself as a storyteller. He has authored more than sixty books that have sold more than 2.5 million copies. His catalog includes novels, biographies, children’s works as well as books on history, culture and faith. He has also been the featured speaker at the National Archives Distinguished Lecture Series, hosted a network television special and does college basketball play-by-play. Ace lives in Arkansas.

Find out more about Ace at http://acecollins.com.

 

My Impressions:

Dogs have long been given the distinction as Man’s (and Woman’s) Best Friend. Nowhere is that better seen than in the relationship between a person and his service dog. Ace Collins has written an eye-opening and inspiring book featuring the selfless dogs that have as their main focus service. Service Tails shares twelve true stories of dogs who have opened doors and restored hope to their owners. The men and women depicted in the stories have a variety of challenges — blindness, deafness, mobility issues — yet all benefitted from the marriage between man and dog. In fact that is one of the major themes running throughout Service Tails. Man and dog become one to break down barriers, relieve loneliness, regain full life and fulfill long held dreams. The first story features Buddy, the first service dog in the United States and the catalyst for the movement here in America. The last story is particularly poignant as it features Salty, a dog whose long service was heartbreakingly ended. But these stories all have great endings in which fierce human determination and canine loyalty and intelligence unite.

My husband is a veterinarian and has seen first hand how the human-dog bond can restore hope. He has several clients with service dogs who have dedicated their lives to their human friends. If you love dogs, dog stories, or just a triumph of spirit, then Service Tails is for you.

Recommended.

Audience: teens to adults.

To purchase this book, click HERE.

(Thanks to LitFuse and Abingdon for a review copy. All opinions expressed are mine alone.)

Giveaway!

Celebrate the release of Service Tails with Ace by entering to win the Take-Your-Dog-to-the-Park Pack!
service-tails-400-2
One grand prize winner will receive:
A copy of Service Tails
A copy of Man’s Best Hero
A dog blanket
A dog leash
A dog-cape towel
A dog bandana
A dog toy
Dog treats

service-tails-prize-collage

Enter today by clicking HERE, but hurry! The giveaway ends on August 30. The winner will be announced August 31 on the Litfuse blog.

Audiobook Review: Swope’s Ridge

11 Sep

41E-T+lIymL._SX321_BO1,204,203,200_September 12, 2001. Four members of the Klasser family are found dead outside Dallas, Texas. In the wake of 9/11, the Klassers’ neighbor, Omar Jones―an American citizen of Arab descent―is convicted of their murder. A month before Jones’ execution, attorney Lije Evans searches for evidence that will prove the man innocent. But Evans’ quest goes deeper than solving one crime. He is determined to find the secret behind the dark history of sleepy Swope’s Ridge―and how it ties into his wife’s murder. Interlocking mysteries lead Evans and his team to the battlegrounds of former Nazi Germany, the dirt roads of Kansas, and a rusty cargo ship in the Gulf of Mexico. Along the way, they discover a secret that offers the promise of great power―and the greatest temptation they’ve ever faced. In the second book of the Lije Evans Mysteries series, bestselling author Ace Collins immerses readers in an intricate and deadly international plot. Racism, betrayal, and death-defying escapes compound an adventure that knows no bounds in this harrowing novel for suspense lovers everywhere.

 

61JASD9CeSL._UX250_Ace Collins is the writer of more than sixty books, including several bestsellers: Stories behind the Best-Loved Songs of Christmas, Stories behind the Great Traditions of Christmas, The Cathedrals, and Lassie: A Dog’s Life. Based in Arkadelphia, Arkansas, He continues to publish several new titles each year, including a series of novels, the first of which is Farraday Road. Ace has appeared on scores of television shows, including CBS This Morning, NBC Nightly News, CNN, Good Morning America, MSNBC, and Entertainment Tonight.

 

My Impressions:

Ace Collins is at the top of my list for suspense authors. I read Farrraday Road a few years back and loved it. It ended with a BIG cliffhanger and begged me to go on to Swope’s Ridge. Well, I finally dug into book 2 via Audible. Its fast-paced, twisting and turning plot didn’t let me down. So my recommendation to you is get both titles and prepare yourself for some page-turning reading.

Swope’s Ridge opens with the closing action of Farraday Road. Lije Evans and his associates are still in danger from those who killed his wife. But the Nazi-era mystery exposed in book 1 gives way to a 9/11 terrorism case. How can a dead SS officer and a death row inmate possibly be connected? With clues pointing to the existence of a legendary Ark of Death, Lije and his team work to solve the case before more innocent lives are lost.

Lije Evans is an interesting character. A small-town lawyer still grieving his wife’s death and in way over his head against powerful, unknown forces, he is determined to discover the reasons surrounding the inexplicable events that have impacted his life. With a shaky faith, Lije continues on despite threats and tragedy because the truth is so important. Lije struggles with the hidden plans and purposes of God – don’t we all — making him a relatable character. The ensemble cast in Swope’s Ridge is strong, and the reader may have a hard time discerning just who the good guys are. The plot is complex and certainly suspenseful, leaving this reader just as mystified as Lije. But all comes together in a satisfying ending. The Nazi-era history was interesting and cleverly tied into the modern-day action.

I read the audiobook version of Swope’s Ridge. The narrator did a good job with pacing and voices.

A great conclusion to the two-book series, Swope’s Ridge is definitely a recommended read.

Recommended.

Audience: adults.

To purchase this book, click HERE.

(I purchased the audiobook from Audible. All opinions expressed are mine alone.)

 

 

Top Ten Tuesday — Auto-Buy Authors

18 Aug

Thanks to The Broke And The Bookish for hosting Top Ten Tuesday. This week bloggers are talking authors that are must buys. To find out more, click HERE.

toptentuesday

Wow! What a great topic for this week’s TTT. Here are the authors that I automatically buy whenever they have a new book published. These authors rarely let me down.

Top 10 Auto-Buy Authors

(In alphabetical order and with their newest or upcoming release. For those with upcoming releases — I cannot wait!)

Terri Blackstock — Twisted Innocence

Melody Carlson –– Home, Hearth and Holidays

Ace Collins — The Fruitcake Murders

51eUos1HviL._SX322_BO1,204,203,200_Unknown61boxOQhMhL._SX327_BO1,204,203,200_

Suzanne Woods Fisher — The Imposter

Elizabeth Musser — Love Beyond Limits

Francine Rivers — Bridge to Haven

Dan Walsh — Keeping Christmas

51JOlyud0iL._SX322_BO1,204,203,200_Unknown-151RTfC53eSL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_Unknown-2

Robert Whitlow — A House Divided

Lis Wiehl — Lethal Beauty

Lisa Wingate — The Sea Keeper’s Daughter

Unknown-3Unknown-4Unknown-5

Who are your auto-buy authors?

Book Review: The Color of Justice

19 Feb

Jesus told him, “Go and do likewise.” Luke 10:37

7700361964

Justice, Mississippi, is a town divided. White and black. Rich and poor. Rule makers and rule breakers. Right or wrong, everyone assumes their place behind a fragile façade that is about to crumble. When attorney Coop Lindsay agrees to defend a black man accused of murdering a white teenager, the bribes and death threats don’t intimidate him. As he prepares for the case of a lifetime, the young lawyer knows it’s the verdict that poses the real threat—innocent or guilty, because of his stand Coop is no longer welcome in Justice. As he follows his conscience, he wonders just how far some people will go to make sure he doesn’t finish his job?

2014

To some, the result of the trial still feels like a fresh wound even fifty years later, when Coop’s grandson arrives in Justice seeking answers to the questions unresolved by the trial that changed his family’s legacy. When a new case is presented, again pitting white against black, this third generation Lindsay may have the opportunity he needs to right the wrongs of the past.

But hate destroys everything it touches, and the Lindsay family will not escape unscathed.

 

ace-collins-199x300Bestselling author Ace Collins has written more than fifty books including novels Farraday Road, Swope’s Ridge and Words of the Father, as well as the nonfiction Stories Behind The Best-Loved Songs of Christmas, grAttitudes, and Lassie: A Dog’s Life. His books have become movies and network television specials. He has appeared on Good Morning America, the NBC Nightly News and The Today Show and has been featured in the Distinguished Lecture Series at the National Archives in Washington D.C. Ace Collins has sold more than 1.5 million books during his career.

 

My Impressions:

The Color of Justice is By The Book’s February selection, and preliminary polls indicate this one will get two thumbs up! Ace Collins has long been a favorite of mine. He writes thought-provoking fiction that is no less entertaining. And his latest novel is my favorite by far. Have you read this book? We are meeting tomorrow to discuss it. We would love to have your thoughts.

Justice, Mississippi in 1964 is a segregated small town where blacks and whites know their place. When a horrible murder disturbs the peace, the ugliness that is exposed is not just the crime. A young black man is accused and the controlling white population is ready to try, convict and mete out justice even before a trial takes place. But Cooper “Coop” Lindsey confronts his own prejudices and the words of his minister father and takes on the highly controversial case. What results is a page-turning, legal suspense novel that explores more than the legal and cultural atmosphere of the South in the 60s. It causes the reader to examine what he truly believes and is willing to live out.

The Color of Justice is two stories in one. The majority of the action takes place during the summer of 1964. Collins has masterfully brought the life and times of that volatile period of the South into clear perspective. No punches are pulled in its description of the reality of life for both blacks and whites during that era. The fear of speaking out and standing for what is right is palatable as is the hate hidden from direct view, but real all the same. I came to love and care about the characters in this novel and literally gasped when that story concluded. Coop’s grandson returns to Justice in 2014 to get the answers he needs and ends up in the middle of a mystery and court case of his own. Long buried secrets are exposed and provide the characters and the reader the closure they need. A strong message of faith is threaded throughout the book, and I loved how Collins used Coop’s minister father’s message of the Good Samaritan to influence his son long after his death.

The Color of Justice is certainly going to be on my Best of The Best list this year. Great for book club discussions, I highly recommend it.

Highly Recommended.

Great for Book Clubs.

Audience: older teens to adults.

(I purchased this book for my Kindle. All opinions expressed are mine alone.)

To purchase this book, click HERE.

February Book Club Picks

2 Feb

This month both my book clubs picked novels set in Mississippi. By The Book is reading The Color of Justice by Ace Collins and Page Turners is reading The Cherry Cola Book Club by Ashton Lee.

Have you read either of the books? What did you think? If you haven’t, consider joining us. We’d love to hear your thoughts.

 

7700361964

Justice, Mississippi, is a town divided. White and black. Rich and poor. Rule makers and rule breakers. Right or wrong, everyone assumes their place behind a fragile façade that is about to crumble. When attorney Coop Lindsay agrees to defend a black man accused of murdering a white teenager, the bribes and death threats don’t intimidate him. As he prepares for the case of a lifetime, the young lawyer knows it’s the verdict that poses the real threat—innocent or guilty, because of his stand Coop is no longer welcome in Justice. As he follows his conscience, he wonders just how far some people will go to make sure he doesn’t finish his job?

2014

To some, the result of the trial still feels like a fresh wound even fifty years later, when Coop’s grandson arrives in Justice seeking answers to the questions unresolved by the trial that changed his family’s legacy. When a new case is presented, again pitting white against black, this third generation Lindsay may have the opportunity he needs to right the wrongs of the past.

But hate destroys everything it touches, and the Lindsay family will not escape unscathed.

 

13613777Set in a small town in Mississippi, The Cherry Cola Book Club is the touching and sometimes hilarious story of a young, upbeat librarian who has been given an ultimatum to increase the library’s circulation dramatically — or risk having to close its doors.

Maura doesn’t just start a book club; she gets involved in unique and unexpected ways with her library patrons. She entertains and advises them, she has potluck dinners, and life in the town begins to imitate art. The patrons begin to relate their own lives to the work of writers like Margaret Mitchell and Harper Lee. In moving and personal ways, Maura helps them deal with such subjects as long-lost love and a brush with death, offering advice on nearly everything — including romance. No topic is off limits. Along the way, Maura raises the profile of the library — but will it be enough?