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Book Review + Author Interview — Healing Love by Jennifer Slattery

26 Jul

A news anchor intern has it all planned out, and love isn’t on the agenda.

Brooke Endress is on the cusp of her lifelong dream when her younger sister persuades her to chaperone a mission trip to El Salvador. Packing enough hand sanitizer and bug spray to single-handedly wipe out malaria, she embarks on what she hopes will be a once-in-a-lifetime experience.

But Brooke is blindsided by the desperation for hope and love she sees in the orphans’ eyes. And no less by the connection she feels with her handsome translator. As newfound passion blooms, Brooke wrestles with its implications for her career dreams.

Ubaldo Chavez, teacher and translate, knows the struggle that comes with generational poverty. But he found the way out – education – and is determined to help his students rise above.

When he agrees to translate for a mission team from the United States he expects to encounter a bunch of “missional tourists” full of empty promises. Yet an American news anchor defies his expectations, and he finds himself falling in love. But what does he have to offer someone with everything?

My Impressions:

Healing Love can be categorized as a contemporary romance since it has a love story that develops throughout the book. But its message is so much more than that. If anything it tells the story of a young woman who falls in love with God’s people. Inspired by a mission trip the author’s family participated in, this dual setting novel (California and El Salvador) explores the desperate needs of people and our response to it. I really liked this one, and if you have a heart for missions and love a happily-ever-after ending, you will too!

Brooke Endress is two years out of grad school and pursuing her dream of working in broadcast journalism. Reluctantly she agrees to accompany her teenaged sister on a mission trip to El Salvador. As Brooke is confronted with the realities of the desperate life of poverty in that country, her whole perspective is turned upside down. Translator Ubaldo Calla has his worldview challenged as well when discovers that the beautiful North American is not the spoiled woman he thought, but deeply caring with a love for his home country.

The contrast between American life and the crippling poverty of El Salvador is uncovered in Healing Love. This novel brought the struggle of survival to life for this reader. Slattery doesn’t shy away from sharing the problems of El Salvador — poverty, child labor, sexual abuse, poor education. The missions team that Brooke accompanies makes an impression, but it is really long term action that is required to truly make a difference. I really liked the spiritual growth that Brooke and Ubaldo undergo as they heal relationships and touch lives.

Full of heart, faith, and love, Healing Love is a great story. It is one that will leave you thinking long after the last page is turned. It is an especially good choice for a book club or missions group.

Recommended.

Audience: adults.

To purchase, click HERE. (It’s free for Kindle Unlimited!)

(Thanks to the author for a complimentary copy. All opinions expressed are mine alone.)

Author, speaker, and ministry leader Jennifer Slattery writes for Crosswalk.com and is the managing and acquiring editor for Guiding Light Women’s Fiction, an imprint with Lighthouse Publishing of the Carolinas. She believes fiction has the power to transform lives and change the culture. Healing Love is her sixth novel, and it was birthed during a trip she and her family took to El Salvador that opened her eyes to the reality of generational poverty and sparked a love for orphans and all who’ve experienced loss.

Her deepest passion is to help women experience God’s love and discover, embrace, and live out who they are in Christ. As the founder of Wholly Loved Ministries, she travels with her team to various churches to speak to women and help them experience the love and freedom only Christ can offer. When not writing, editing, or speaking, you’ll likely find her chatting with her friends or husband in a quiet, cozy coffeehouse. Visit her online at JenniferSlatteryLivesOutLoud.com and connect with her and her Wholly Loved team at WhollyLoved.com.

Q&A with Jennifer Slattery

When did you begin to write?

I’ve been writing in one fashion or another since I learned to hold a pencil. I wrote my first story (or at least, the first one I remember) when I was in maybe fourth or fifth grade for a young author’s contest. I remember being selected from my class, though I can’t remember what I was selected for! Maybe to have my story included in a publication?

For years, I wrote poems, which is interesting because now I stink at poetry, though I do often write song lyrics for my stories. (Music can be such a powerful way to connect with God and soak in truth!). I never really pursued publication or even thought about what that might look like until about a decade ago when I began to sense a clear call from God. I felt God was telling me not only was I to write, and write for Him, but this was to be my predominant focus.

After a bit of resisting (for numerous reasons all related to pride and fear), I surrendered, plunked myself in front of my computer, and penned what later became Breaking Free (my fourth and so far, most popular, release).

What led you to write Healing Love?

The idea for this story came while on a plane ride leaving El Salvador, a country I was initially nervous to visit but quickly became reluctant to leave. Our family joined our church (at the time) for a weeklong mission trip, during which we served at an orphanage for girls who had been sexually abused. It was an incredibly emotional and eye-opening experience.

I left with a broken heart and a large pile of letters the girls had written to me before we left. Those letters remain in the top drawer of my bedside table to this day and serve as a reminder of God’s call to love — however and whenever I can.

On the plane ride back, tears pricking my eyes, letters in my lap, I processed all I’d experienced and saw during my week. All God had shown me, not just about the El Salvador people and the sweet orphans I had so quickly fallen in love with, but about His heart. And almost instantly, a story idea took hold.

The next six months or so were incredibly painful as I researched what life was really like for countless families in El Salvador, many of whom have no choice but to work long hours in the hot sun, many of whom are forced to have their children as young as seven and eight working beside them. Many others who live on trash heaps, scavenging for food. Others still who, desperate to survive, sell their children into sex trafficking. Women and children who’ve sold themselves.

One of the downfalls of having a writer’s brain is that everything in my mind plays out in vivid detail. Add to that the fact that I have a bit of OCD, and my brain can get stuck on replay mode, in this case, a replay that utterly broke me.

One afternoon, I went for a walk, trying not to think about all I learned and the precious children our family had encountered — trying not to see their faces as they flashed through my mind — I started to pray. I don’t remember what I said, except that I asked God why He was allowing me to see such heartache and pain, such suffering.

And as if in response, a gentle yet clear thought arose: This is what He sees daily, only more so. Not only does He see the pain, but He hears their constant, desperate cries as they beg for aid.

Aid that, most often, comes through you and I.

In what ways can you relate to Brooke, the heroine in Healing Love?

Oh, my word! In many, and not always the best of ways. I’ve already admitted I have a bit of OCD. In other words, I like to control my world and everything in it. As with Brooke, this comes out strongest when I feel out of control — threatened, vulnerable. Fearful. When instead I should be turning to God in surrender — because that’s when I find strength and peace. But I’m learning, as is Brooke.

In what ways can you relate to Ubaldo, the hero?

Sweet Ubaldo. He means well, and he’s done and is doing a lot of good. I love that he’s driven by his integrity and a genuine love for others. But he can get so focused on doing what he believes to be right that he can in fact hurt others and push them away. I can do that, also. My stubborn, passionate side can become too passionate, working against me and whatever God is calling me to do. Finding the balance between love and truth, passion and grace, can be hard. But again, I’m learning.

Thanks, Jennifer, for sharing your story and your heart!

 

Book Review (+ Giveaway!): The Memory of You

25 Jul

Title:  The Memory of You

Author: Catherine West
Publisher:  Thomas Nelson

Release Date:  March 28, 2017
Genre: Inspirational Contemporary Fiction

Thirteen years ago, Natalie lost a part of herself when her twin sister died. Will traveling back to the family winery finally put the memory to rest, or will it completely destroy her?

When Natalie Mitchell learns her beloved grandfather has had a heart attack, she’s forced to return to their family-owned winery in Sonoma, something she never intended to do. She’s avoided her grandparents’ sprawling home and all its memories since the summer her sister died—the awful summer Natalie’s nightmares began. But the winery is failing, and Natalie’s father wants her to shut it down. As the majority shareholder, she has the power to do so.
And Natalie never says no to her father.

Tanner Collins, the vintner on Maoilios, is trying to salvage a bad season and put the Mitchell family’s winery back in business. When Natalie Mitchell shows up, Tanner sees his future about to be crushed. Natalie intends to close the gates, unless he can convince her otherwise. But the Natalie he remembers from childhood is long gone, and he’s not so sure he likes the woman she’s become. Still, the haunted look she wears hints at secrets he wants to unearth. He soon discovers that on the night her sister died, the real Natalie died too. And Tanner must do whatever it takes to resurrect her.

But finding freedom from the past means facing it. 

TO PURCHASE A COPY

Catherine West is an award-winning author who writes stories of hope and healing from her island home in Bermuda. Her first novel, Yesterday’s Tomorrow, released in 2011 and won the INSPY for Romance, a Silver Medal in the Reader’s Favorite Awards, and was a finalist in the Grace Awards. Catherine’s second novel, Hidden in the Heart, released in September 2012, was long listed in the 2012 INSPY’s and was a finalist in the 2013 Grace Awards.

 

When she’s not at the computer working on her next story, you can find her taking her Border Collie for long walks or tending to her roses and orchids. She and her husband have two grown children. Catherine is a member of American Christian Fiction Writers and Romance Writers of America, and is represented by Rachelle Gardner of Books & Such Literary. Catherine loves to connect with her readers and can be reached at Catherine@catherinejwest.com.

CONNECT WITH CATHERINE:  Website | Facebook | Twitter | Pinterest | Instagram

 

My Impressions:

You know when you open a novel by Catherine West you will immediately be swept into a story that will engage your senses and your heart. Her novel, The Memory of You, is no exception. This relationship drama had me from the opening lines and kept me engaged until the final page was turned. Be prepared to laugh and cry and to love this book.

Nicole Mitchell survived a tragic accident at the age of thirteen. Years later the trauma remains. The daughter of a high-powered businessman and a distracted mother, Nicole seeks first to appease and please when she is ordered to return to her grandfather’s winery to shut it down. But as she encounters one hurtful memory after another, Nicole also comes face to face with truth and healing. Tanner Collins has regrets and guilt of his own. As he and Nicole navigate their renewed relationship, the two start to hope for a future with dreams fulfilled instead of nightmares endured.

The Memory of You is a complex novel. There are a number of plot threads that taken singly would make a good novel, but when combined provide the reader with a beautifully composed tapestry filled with real-life struggles and emotions. The novel is Nicole and Tanner’s story first and foremost, but the supporting characters add a depth that creates a true picture of human interaction. Great writing keeps the narrative flowing — this one is a true pleasure to read. The setting is a vineyard, and West proves her meticulous research through the detailed descriptions of the daily operations. I found those points fascinating and an added bonus to the story.

There are a number of themes explored in The Memory of You. Secrets are shown to kill — dreams, hopes, relationships and peace. But God is the healer that can restore all that secrets seek to kill. Nicole and Tanner struggle with a God that they feel is silent or not present in the midst of their deepest hurts, a sentiment that resonated with me.  Nicole asks “Does God really care about us, Tanner? Does He love us more than we can ever comprehend?” To which Tanner answers “Yes. I believe that. I don’t always act like it or understand it , but I can’t dispute it.”  I appreciated the doubts expressed and the truth revealed.

The Memory of You is a book you won’t want to put down, and will be sad to finish. Take your time with this one; you are going to love it.

Highly Recommended.

Audience: adults.

(Thanks to Just Commonly and the author for a complimentary copy. All opinions expressed are mine alone.)

 

Tour Schedule

Many thanks to the publisher, Thomas Nelson & Zondervan Fiction 
for providing review copies to our bloggers.

7/17 – Running Through the Storm
7/18 – Moments Dipped in Ink
7/19 – Favorite Christian Books
7/20 – Joy’s Blog
7/21 – Happy When Reading
7/22 – Splashes of Joy
7/23 – Reading is My SuperPower
7/24 – Bibliophile Reviews
7/25 – By The Book
7/26 – Reader’s Cozy Corner
7/27 – All of a Kind Mom
7/28 –  Smiling Book Reviews
7/29 – Savings in Seconds
7/30 – Heidi Reads . . .

 

Giveaway

(1) Winner will win a gourmet gift basket + a signed copy of The Memory of You, 
courtesy of the author, Catherine West.
(US mailing addresses only for the gift basket & print book prize.
International winners will win a digital copy of the book.)

To enter, click HERE.

 

Book Review (+ Giveaway): Grounded Hearts

21 Jul

In the midst of World War II, Ireland has declared herself neutral. Troops found on Irish soil must be reported and interned, no matter which side they are fighting for. When midwife Nan O’Neil finds a wounded young Canadian pilot at her door, she knows she’s taking a huge risk by letting him in. Not only is she a widow living alone, but if caught harboring a combatant, she’ll face imprisonment.

Still, something compels Nan to take in “flyboy” Dutch Whitney, an RAF pilot whose bomber has just crashed over County Clare. While she tends to his wounds and gives him a secret place of refuge, the two begin to form a mutual affection—and an unbreakable bond.

But Nan has another secret, one that has racked her with guilt since her husband’s death and made her question ever loving again. As Nan and Dutch plan his escape, can he help restore her faith?

 

Jeanne M. Dickson was born into an Irish American family, the only girl surrounded by four brothers. She credits her mother, her aunts, and her grandmother with her love of storytelling. Perfecting her craft, she attends many writer’s conferences and over the years, she has won and finaled in numerous RWA romance writing awards including the Daphne du Maurier Award, the Maggie Award, The Molly, The Tara, and she was the overall contest winner of Launching A Star. Today she lives in Coastal San Diego with her fabulous husband, her two wonderful girls, and a dozen disobedient rose bushes.

Find out more about Jeanne M. at http://www.jeannemdickson.com.

My Impressions:

I finished Grounded Hearts by Jeanne Dickson a few days ago. Usually I write a review immediately so I can get down all the things that I love, like, or sometimes dislike about a book. I read a lot of books, so this is essential in capturing my thoughts before moving on to the next book. But I’ve waited on writing this review because I needed to take time to fully explore what I did indeed like about it and to articulate those things I didn’t. The premise of this book intrigued me. I knew little about Ireland’s stance during WWII other than the fact that it was neutral. How does a nation remain neutral in such a big conflict with more than disputed territories at stake? So, I was intrigued and eager to read a novel featuring a downed RAF pilot aided by a local woman with lots to lose. A touch of romance added to the suspense and adventure was okay with me. So far, so good. However, there were elements of the book that made me uncomfortable and others that made me a bit angry. Grounded Hearts was indeed a thought-provoking read, but perhaps not in ways that the author intended.

Nan O’Neill is a midwife in a small Irish village during WWII. Life has dealt her a harsh blow and she wrestles with guilt and what-ifs. RAF pilot Dutch Whitney knows his purpose is to save the world, one bombing run at a time. But his goals become out of reach as he parachutes into the bog in neutral Ireland. The two join forces in getting Dutch to Northern Ireland and back to the war. But of course there are many obstacles to that, including the growing romantic feelings between them.

First let me say that Dickson is a great storyteller. In the about the author section of the book she credits a long line of storytelling women that influenced her. Her writing is very good, setting a believable stage for the reader. As said above the story itself is intriguing and made me want to read it. She gave credible insight into the attitudes and politics of the time. But the book soon got bogged down in the many references to the two main characters’ physical attributes. Not only do they have impure thoughts (Nan is Catholic after all), supporting characters often give open voice to them as well. Perhaps not a problem in general market fiction, but Grounded Hearts is termed inspirational. I’m no prude and often like an edgy book, but the constant references seemed to be more for titillation than advancing the plot. If the references had moved from physical admiration to a deeper attraction, I could have overlooked them, but Nan and Dutch’s relationship just never seemed to mature. With all that said, I had much more trouble with the stereotypical portrayal of Catholics and men. A book set in Ireland in the 1940s is going to have a large share of Catholic characters, but they are portrayed as winking at sin, as long as it is eventually confessed. Kind of the it’s easier to ask forgiveness than permission philosophy. I know that this attitude exists, but I would have liked if the entire parish of Ballyhaven had not behaved that way. Then there is the portrayal of men. They are either bullies or buffoons, or both. The women are the real thinkers and doers, while the men spend time gossiping and drinking at the pub. Strong women are a wonderful edition, but not at the expense of every man (including Dutch) in the novel.

There are strong themes of guilt and forgiveness in Grounded Hearts. And the message that one can become free by the grace of God is on point. This truth is hinted at throughout the book and is finally accepted by Nan. I would have liked for this element to have had a bigger role in character and plot development.

I know that this review is rather harsh, but I wanted not to shy away from stating what I truly thought. Grounded Hearts could have been a great novel; it had all the elements. Wonderful writing, unique premise, interesting setting and characters. But its reliance on things that I would rather not see in inspirational fiction put me off. Please note that I am in the minority among other reviewers. It has an overall 4-star rating on Amazon, with over 50% of reviewers giving it 5-stars. Please make sure to read their reviews to make your own judgment.

Audience: adults.

(Thanks to LitFuse for a complimentary copy. All opinions expressed are mine alone.)

 

Giveaway

Join Jeanne in celebrating the release of her new book by entering to win the Celtic Knots Giveaway!

One grand prize winner will receive:

Enter today by clicking HERE, but hurry! The giveaway ends on July 31. The winner will be announced August 1 on the Litfuse blog.

Children’s Corner — The Berenstain Bears Bless Our Gramps and Grans

20 Jul

In The Berenstain Bears Bless Our Gramps and Gran, the newest title in The Berenstain Bears Living Lights series, Mama, Papa, and the cubs decide it’s high time they honor Grizzly Gramps and Gran.

It’s almost Grandparents Day and the Bear family has never celebrated this special day before. So working as a team, the cubs, with a little help from Mama and Papa, come up with a fun and creative way to show Gramps and Gran just how much they are loved and appreciated.

To purchase, click HERE.

 

My Impressions: 

The first Sunday after Labor Day has been designated Grandparents Day, and the Berenstain Bears will help you celebrate with Bless Our Gramps And Gran. In this book, the Bear Family shows their appreciation for their grandparents as well as sharing a favorite Bible story with a new perspective. Colorful and fun illustrations accompany the read-along text. Vocabulary is challenging enough for developing readers as they learn about Noah and his family while thinking of ways grandparents add to our lives. Kids will find the story engaging, and adults will have a chuckle or two as the Bear cubs put their own twist on Noah’s family. The book includes ways to celebrate Grandparents Day in your own family or church — love that!

Just in time for Grandparents Day, Bless Our Gramps And Gran is a great addition to your family’s library.

Recommended.

Audience: preschool — 3rd grade and their parents/grandparents.

(Thanks to Zonderkidz for a complimentary copy. All opinions expressed are mine alone.)

Book Review: The Cover Story

17 Jul

A bizarre hit-and-run brings Branigan Powers back to the crime-solving beat.

A fatal crash involving two college students heading home for the holidays seems like an unfortunate accident. But when the surviving girl wakens, she tells a curious story of the vehicle that forced them off the road–an old-fashioned, 1950s-style hearse.

Reporter Branigan Powers delves into the mystery that takes her to the college campus, and leads her into dangerous fraternity and sorority pledge parties.

Reunited with the homeless Malachi Martin, who is so adept at seeing what isn’t there rather than what is, Branigan must uncover what is really going on at the college before other students are put in danger.

This second installment in the author’s first cozy mystery series delves into the world of newspapers and life on the streets — both of which the author knows well.

Deb Richardson-Moore was a reporter for The Greenville (SC) News for 27 years before earning a Master of Divinity degree and becoming pastor of the Triune Mercy Center, a non-denominational mission church with outreach to Greenville’s homeless population.

Her first book, The Weight of Mercy, chronicled her first three turbulent years among her homeless congregants.
When her publisher (Lion Hudson LLC in England) asked for a second book, Deb pivoted to fiction and wrote a murder mystery that has a homeless encampment as a backdrop. The Cantaloupe Thief is a puzzling whodunit that explores what happens when an entire group of people is unseen, unheard, unrecognized.

Deb is a graduate of Wake Forest University and Erskine Theological Seminary. She and her husband, Vince, have three grown children, and live in Greenville, SC.

My Impressions:

The Cover Story is the second installment in Deb Richardson-Moore’s Braningan Powers Mystery series. Combining a small town setting with real-life issues of homelessness, this novel has a depth that is not always found in the cozy genre. It is, of course, first and foremost a mystery, and a puzzling one at that. I did not see the ending coming despite the clues revealed by the author. An investigative reporter and a police detective are two characters on the case, something fairly standard in a mystery novel. But the addition of a homeless man as investigator, someone invisible to most regular people, is genius. The Cover Story is a great addition to your mystery library, and one I can recommend.

The story opens with a hit and run that leaves one college coed dead and another seriously injured. The facts of the case seem unbelievable, until the vague memories of the surviving victim are revealed over time. There are suspects galore, and the questions concerning the case are seemingly unanswerable. But with the main characters investigating in their specific worlds — newspaper reporter, policeman, and homeless man — they, and the readers discover just whodunit. Appearances are truely deceiving.

Author Richardson-Moore has vast experience with the homeless, and her passion and compassion are revealed within the pages of The Cover Story. Malachi Martin, a veteran living on the streets, is a very intriguing character. Street smart and intelligent, he is able to uncover things because of his invisibility. Either inadvertently or by choice, those living a normal life don’t see him. But his unique position allows for him to see things many wish to hide.

I really enjoyed this unusual and engaging mystery. It is the second in a series, but can be read as a standalone. But I recommend starting at the beginning with The Cantaloupe Thief, another excellent mystery novel.

Recommended.

Audience: adults.

To purchase, click HERE.

(Thanks to Kregel and Lion Hudson for a complimentary copy. All opinions expressed are mine alone.)

 

 

Book Review: The Welcome Committee of Butternut Creek

13 Jul

Upon his arrival, Butternut Creek Christian Church’s newly-minted minister is met by a welcome committee led by Miss Birdie and her friend Mercedes, a.k.a. “the Widows.” Their first order of business, to educate him on how things should be done, quickly gives way to a campaign to find him a wife.

When their matchmaking efforts fizzle, the Widows turn to another new bachelor. Amputee and Afghan vet Sam simply wants to be left alone– a desire that’s as good as a red flag to the Widows! Soon they’re scheming to pair him up with Willow, his beautiful physical therapist, a divorced mother of two who is afraid of commitment, Perrine’s small-town tale is a big-time triumph of gentle humor, fast-paced plot, and wonderfully engaging characters.

 

Jane Myers Perrine started writing while in grade school. Although her spelling was terrible — she blames that on dyslexia — her third-grade teacher predicted she’d be an author. Jane attended Kansas State University. Majoring in both English and Spanish, she read the best literature in both languages. After years as a Spanish teacher and minister, she began writing. Her novels include Regency settings and Western historicals as well as stories which take place in the beautiful Hill Country of Texas where she now resides. An award-winning author, she writes about a young minister, Adam Jordan, and his life in Butternut Creek, TX as well as humorous mysteries.

 

My Impressions:

I am a sucker for a small town book. You know, the kind that Jan Karon made famous. I sort of collect them — they reside in stacks on my TBR shelf. With a little bit of time between must-reads for reviews, I picked up The Welcome Committee of Butternut Creek. This book is the first in a 3-book series and has been out a few years. Its hometown flavor, quirky and endearing characters, and sometimes tough subject matter, made this a surprisingly good read. Surprising because I wasn’t expecting depth, but a fun bit of fluff. While it often made me chuckle, it also grabbed my heartstrings. I can recommend this one.

There is an ensemble cast in The Welcome Committee of Butternut Creek — the Widows (self-proclaimed helpers of the church and community), pastor Adam Jordan (newly minted seminary graduate), Sam (a wounded Marine), and Willow (a physical therapist). These characters interact as only those living in a small town can. Everyone knows your business and everyone cares. Struggles are real: finding a niche in a new community, dealing with PTSD, overcoming divorce, and raising grandkids. The small community of Butternut Creek is not a cliche, but a slice of real life. Although published by FaithWords, it does not have an overt spiritual message. Rather, many of the characters live out their faith in natural ways. Other characters are very worldly (sexual innuendo and drinking are their MO) and don’t have any time or patience for the God thing. Many have not come around to the ways of church at the end of the book, but a lot of progress has been made. There are 2 more books to tie up all the ends.

All in all a quick read with a great deal of depth.

Recommended.

Audience: adults.

To purchase this book, click HERE. (It is currently $2.23 for the paperback on Amazon!)

(I purchased this book. All opinions expressed are mine alone.)

Children’s Corner — The Berenstain Bears 5-Minute Inspirational Stories

12 Jul

The Berenstain Bears 5-Minute Read-Along Stories is the perfect companion for young readers at bedtime or anytime. With classic stories from the Berenstain Bears Living Lights series, join the Bear family and all their friends in Bear Country as they learn how to be good friends, how to play fairly, where to find courage, and much more. This oversize padded storybook is sure to become a lap time favorite for Berenstain fans, both young and old, as they read these stories in 5 minutes.

Stories included are:

The Berenstain Bears and the Forgiving Tree, The Berenstain Bears God Loves You, The Berenstain Bears Say Their Prayers, The Berenstain Bears Love Their Neighbors, The Berenstain Bears’ Faithful Friends, The Berenstain Bears’ Biggest Brag, The Berenstain Bears and the Gift of Courage, The Berenstain Bears Blessed are the Peacemakers, The Berenstain Bears Get Involved, The Berenstain Bears’ Gossip Gang, The Berenstain Bears God Bless Our Home, and The Berenstain Bears Here’s the Church, Here’s the Steeple.

 

My Impressions:

Reading is very important to a child’s development and helps a child understand themselves and the world around them. I love when children’s stories are entertaining and teach valuable life lessons, including God’s love and purposes. In The Berenstain Bears 5-Minute Inspirational Stories, you and your child can share in the joy of reading with stories that speak right to the heart of a child’s life, especially their place in God’s world. There are 12 colorfully illustrated stories featuring the beloved Bear family. The text is challenging for developing readers and works well with parent-child read-along times. Children will have fun practicing their skills, and parents can use the stories as a springboard for more discussion. The book bills itself as a 5-minute read along, but it will probably take kids longer if they are doing the reading themselves. Depending on the age and skill level of your child, you can use this book to fit your needs and goals.

I really liked The Berenstain Bears 5-Minute Inspirational Stories and recommend it!

Recommended. 

Audience: preschool through 3rd grade.

To purchase, click HERE.

(Thanks to Zonderkidz for a complimentary copy. All opinions expressed are mine alone.)