Audiobook Mini-Review: Remembering Dresden

8 Jun

Young history professor, Jack Turner, takes a retreat at a lakeside cabin just outside of Culpepper, Georgia to work on his doctoral dissertation. The cabin is owned by an ambitious state senator, an inheritance from his father. Inside, everything is exactly the way it was when the old man died ten years ago. While taking a break from his research, Jack snoops through the father’s books and finds an old photo album filled with black-and-white pictures of orphaned children. Intrigued, he continues searching and finds what appears to be evidence of murder and an old leather journal, handwritten entirely in German. Rachel Cook, Jack’s girlfriend, translates the journal for him. What it reveals instantly puts both of their lives in mortal danger.

Dan Walsh is the bestselling author of 21 novels (all available on Amazon), including The Unfinished Gift, Rescuing Finley, When Night Comes, and The Reunion (now being made into a feature film). Over 1 million copies of Dan’s books are in print or downloaded. He’s won both the Carol and Selah Awards multiple times, 4 of his novels have been finalists for RT Reviews Inspirational Novel of the Year.

Reviewers often remark about Dan’s rich, character-driven storylines and page-turning suspense (even with his more inspirational books). He’s been writing full-time since 2010. He and his wife Cindi have been married 43 years, have 2 grown children and 4 grandchildren. They live in the Daytona Beach area, where Dan grew up. You can follow him on Facebook or Twitter, read his blog, or preview all his books by visiting his website at http://www.danwalshbooks.com.

 

My Impressions:

Remembering Dresden is the second book in the Jack Turner Suspense series by Dan Walsh. The action in this book begins about a year after the events in book 1, When Night Comes. Main character Jack Turner has joined the university as a history professor while working on his dissertation to acquire his PhD. He has seemingly gotten over the trauma that filled his days and nights the year before and is settling into a routine of work while advancing his relationship with Rachel.  All seems good until he discovers a journal and scrapbook at a cabin he is renting — all thoughts of scholarly research go out the window! I liked the growth we see in Jack. He is not nearly as naive (my husband said he was a doofus 😉 ) and has done things to be able to defend himself and Rachel should future threats emerge. And the threats do! If you like a quick-pace in your reading, then this one is for you. Interactions between Jack and Detective Joe Boyd have gone from disbelief and distrust to a mutual respect and willingness to work together to get to the bottom of a decades old case. I see that Walsh has another series featuring Boyd, and the development of his character in this novel leaves me anticipating those books as well. One big plus for me was the description of the Dresden firebombing that involved British and American forces during WWII. The scenes depicted were truly horrific and added greatly to my understanding of that event. That pivotal event in the past set in motion all that Jack uncovers, as well as the attempts to thwart his investigation. Walsh does a great job of blending past and present in a highly readable suspense novel. I purchased the audiobook version and could not stop listening!. The reader is the same as book 1, and did a good job of bringing the characters to life.

Recommended.

Audience: adults.

(I purchased the audiobook from Audible. All opinions expressed are mine alone.)

 

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