Book Review: The Englisch Daughter

27 Apr

Old Order Amish wife and mother Jemima has put her marriage and family ahead of herself for years. She’s set herself aside. Raising four children, she’s followed all the rules and has been patient in looking forward to her time to chase a dream of her own.

But when she finds out that her life savings for pursuing that dream is gone — and her husband, Roy, has been hiding a child with another woman — her entire world is shattered. Will she be able to listen to God and love Roy’s child? With so much at stake, how can she and Roy fix their relationship before their lives come crashing down

Cindy Woodsmall is the “New York Times” and CBA best-selling author of eighteen works of fiction. She’s been featured in national media outlets such as ABC’s “Nightline” and the “Wall Street Journal”. Cindy has won numerous awards and has been finalist for the prestigious Christy, Rita, and Carol Awards. Cindy and her husband reside near the foothills of the North Georgia Mountains in Flowery Branch, GA.

Erin Woodsmall is a writer, musician, wife, and mom of three. She has edited, brainstormed, and researched books with Cindy for almost a decade. She is very excited about their first coauthored book.

Find out more about Cindy and Erin at http://www.cindywoodsmall.com.

 

My Impressions:

Authors Cindy and Erin Woodsmall have teamed up again to bring fans of Amish fiction another great read. This mother-in-law/daughter-in-law duo set stories in Plain communities, but there is nothing simple about the issues their characters face. The pace may be slower, but they face real-life struggles just like those in the more modern world. To me that is a plus — a story that resonates with the reader showing that people are people wherever or whenever they live. So if you want a true to life story, pick up The Englisch Daughter.

There are four main characters in The English Daughter — husband and wife Jemima and Roy, Roy’s sister Abigail, and newcomer to the community, Chris. All four struggle with identity and their roles within relationships as determined by experiences and their community’s expectations. And a realistic perspective of identity is everything whether Amish or English. I found the emphasis within the Amish community to conform, to forgive, to move on, interesting and thought-provoking. There is a great deal of tension and conflict within the pages of The Englisch Daughter, but also healing.

While there is plenty of Amish flavor in The Englisch Daughter, it really is a story for every time and place. It is also a book that would create great conversations, making it a good choice for book clubs. So grab your friends, and dig in!

Recommended.

Audience: Adults.

(Thanks to Waterbrook for a complimentary copy. All opinions expressed are mine alone.)

 

 

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