Book Review: The Pirate Bride

6 Apr

Can a former privateer and a determined heiress find lost treasure in 1725?
 A brand new series for fans of all things related to history, romance, adventure, faith, and family trees.



Pasts Collide in New Orleans when a Treasure Goes Missing
 The last time New Orleans attorney Jean-Luc Valmont saw Maribel Cordoba, a Spanish nobleman’s daughter, she was an eleven-year-old orphan perched in the riggings of his privateering vessel proving herself as the best lookout on his crew. Until the day his infamy caught up with them all and innocent lives were lost. Unsure why he survived but vowing to make something of the chance he was given, Jean-Luc has buried his past life so deep that no living person will ever find it—until a very much alive and very grown up Maribel Cordoba arrives on his doorstep and threatens all he now holds dear. 



Join the adventure as the Daughters of the Mayflower series continues with The Pirate Bride by Kathleen Y’Barbo.



 

RITA and Carol award nominee Kathleen Y’Barbo is the best-selling, award-winning author of more than forty novels, novellas, and young adult books. In all, more than one million copies of her books are currently in print in the US and abroad, and her books have been translated into Dutch, German, and Spanish, to name a few.

Kathleen is a member of American Christian Fiction Writers and Romance Writers of America. She holds a BBA from Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School and a certification in Paralegal Studies, and is a former member of the Texas Bar Association’s Paralegal Division.

A tenth-generation Texan, Kathleen Y’Barbo has four children of her own as well as seven bonus kids she gladly inherited when she married her own hero in combat boots (read about their real-life romance here!). Kathleen is proud to be a military wife, even if it did mean giving up her Texas drivers license.

To connect with her through social media, check out the links on her website at www.kathleenybarbo.com.

 

My Impressions:

Join the adventure on the high seas in the latest book in The Daughters of The Mayflower series, The Pirate Bride. Set on the sparkling blue waters of the Caribbean Sea, the quiet beaches of a remote island, and the busy streets of New Orleans, this novel hits all the right buttons for fans of historical romance — an endearing heroine, a truly heroic (and hunky) hero, and fascinating history of privateers of the early 1700s. This one gets a recommended rating from me.

Maribel Cordoba is just 12 years old when she loses her family and is swept up into intrigue and adventure on a pirate ship. At least she believes the young captain of the Ghost Ship is a pirate. He asserts he is doing the King’s business with Letters of Marque signed by the French government. But whether privateer or pirate, Captain Beaumont is a protector of the vulnerable and determines to take care of the adventure-seeking Maribel. However, a bounty on his head puts all in his care in peril.

I liked a lot of things about The Pirate Bride. Its main character, Maribel, is an engaging (and exasperating) young girl, and only a bit less exasperating as a young woman. She steals the heart of the crew in her brief time on the ship, and steals the heart of the captain years later. Of course the dashing ship’s captain is also a favorite, but the supporting characters add a wonderful dimension as well. The story is lightly told, yet filled with action, intrigue, and danger. Twists and turns and surprises abound. The historical setting is interesting —  I loved the details the author includes to give the novel an authentic feel. Faith in God, with an emphasis on prayer, is naturally woven throughout the book.

As I was reading The Pirate Bride, I thought what a wonderful beach read for fans of historical romance! A quick and fun book, you’ll enjoy this one next to the pool or on a blanket on the beach.

Recommended.

Audience: adults.

To purchase this book, click HERE.

(Thanks to Barbour Publishing for a complimentary copy. All opinions expressed are mine alone.)

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