Top 10 Tuesday — Revolutionary Reading!

4 Jul

The folks at The Broke And The Bookish are taking a well-deserved break until the middle of August. They all have lots on their plates, including new additions to their families. 🙂 So bloggers are on their own creating weekly Top 10 Tuesday memes. In honor of the 4th of July, I’ve decided to share some great books set in the years surrounding the Revolutionary War — 7 novels and 1 non-fiction title, plus 1 that is on my TBR list. Have a great 4th, y’all!

 

 

Top Books to Read for The 4th of July!

Book of Ages: The Life And Opinions of Jane Franklin by Jill Lepore

From one of our most accomplished and widely admired historians—a revelatory portrait of Benjamin Franklin’s youngest sister, Jane, whose obscurity and poverty were matched only by her brother’s fame and wealth but who, like him, was a passionate reader, a gifted writer, and an astonishingly shrewd political commentator.

Making use of an astonishing cache of little-studied material, including documents, objects, and portraits only just discovered, Jill Lepore brings Jane Franklin to life in a way that illuminates not only this one extraordinary woman but an entire world.

Burning Sky by Lori Benton

Abducted by Mohawk Indians at fourteen and renamed Burning Sky, Willa Obenchain is driven to return to her family’s New York frontier homestead after many years building a life with the People. At the boundary of her father’s property, Willa discovers a wounded Scotsman lying in her path. Feeling obliged to nurse his injuries, the two quickly find much has changed during her twelve-year absence—her childhood home is in disrepair, her missing parents are rumored to be Tories, and the young Richard Waring she once admired is now grown into a man twisted by the horrors of war and claiming ownership of the Obenchain land.

When her Mohawk brother arrives and questions her place in the white world, the cultural divide blurs Willa’s vision. Can she follow Tames-His-Horse back to the People now that she is no longer Burning Sky? And what about Neil MacGregor, the kind and loyal botanist who does not fit into in her plan for a solitary life, yet is now helping her revive her farm? In the aftermath of the Revolutionary War, strong feelings against “savages” abound in the nearby village of Shiloh, leaving Willa’s safety unsure.

Willa is a woman caught between two worlds. As tensions rise, challenging her shielded heart, the woman called Burning Sky must find a new courage–the courage to again risk embracing the blessings the Almighty wants to bestow. Is she brave enough to love again?

The Courier of Caswell Hall by Melanie Dobson

An unlikely spy discovers freedom and love in the midst of the American Revolution. As the British and Continental armies wage war in 1781, the daughter of a wealthy Virginia plantation owner feels conflict raging in her own heart. Lydia Caswell comes from a family of staunch Loyalists, but she cares only about peace. Her friend Sarah Hammond, however, longs to join the fight. Both women’s families have already been divided by a costly war that sets father against son and neighbor against neighbor; a war that makes it impossible to guess who can be trusted. One snowy night Lydia discovers a wounded man on the riverbank near Caswell Hall, and her decision to save him will change her life. Nathan introduces her to a secret network of spies, couriers, disguises, and coded messages—a network that may be the Patriots’ only hope for winning the war. When British officers take over Caswell Hall and wreak havoc on neighboring plantations, Lydia will have to choose between loyalty and freedom; between her family’s protection and her own heart’s desires. As both armies gather near Williamsburg for a pivotal battle, both Lydia and Sarah must decide how high a price they are willing to pay to help the men they love.

The Creole Princess by Beth White

All along the eastern seaboard, the American struggle for independence rages. In the British-held southern port of Mobile, Alabama, the conflict brewing is quieter–though no less deadly. The lovely Frenchwoman Lyse Lanier is best friends with the daughter of the British commander. Rafael Gonzalez is a charming young Spanish merchant with a secret mission and a shipment of gold to support General Washington. As their paths cross and their destinies become increasingly tangled, Lyse and Rafael must decide where their true loyalties lie–and somehow keep Lyse’s family from being executed as traitors to the British Crown.

The Messenger by Siri Mitchell

Hannah Sunderland felt content in her embrace of the Quaker faith until her twin brother ran off and joined the army and ended up captured and in jail. Suddenly Hannah’s world turns on end. She longs to bring her brother some measure of comfort in the squalid, frigid prison where he remains. But the Quakers believe they are not to take sides, not to take up arms. Can she sit by and do nothing while he suffers?

Jeremiah Jones has an enormous task before him. Responsibility for a spy ring is now his, and he desperately needs access to the men in prison, whom they are seeking to free. A possible solution is to garner a pass for Hannah. But while she is fine to the eye, she holds only disdain for him–and agreeing would mean disobeying those she loves and abandoning a bedrock of her faith.

The Traitor’s Wife by Allison Pataki

Everyone knows Benedict Arnold — the Revolutionary War general who betrayed America and fled to the British — as history’s most notorious turncoat. Many know Arnold’s co-conspirator, Major John André, who was apprehended with Arnold’s documents in his boots and hanged at the orders of General George Washington. But few know of the integral third character in the plot: a charming young woman who not only contributed to the betrayal but orchestrated it.

Socialite Peggy Shippen is half Benedict Arnold’s age when she seduces the war hero during his stint as military commander of Philadelphia. Blinded by his young bride’s beauty and wit, Arnold does not realize that she harbors a secret: loyalty to the British. Nor does he know that she hides a past romance with the handsome British spy John André. Peggy watches as her husband, crippled from battle wounds and in debt from years of service to the colonies, grows ever more disillusioned with his hero, Washington, and the American cause. Together with her former love and her disaffected husband, Peggy hatches the plot to deliver West Point to the British and, in exchange, win fame and fortune for herself and Arnold.

Told from the perspective of Peggy’s maid, whose faith in the new nation inspires her to intervene in her mistress’s affairs even when it could cost her everything, The Traitor’s Wife brings these infamous figures to life, illuminating the sordid details and the love triangle that nearly destroyed the American fight for freedom.

Washington’s Lady by Nancy Moser

Known for moving first-person novels of Nannerl Mozart, Jane Austen, and Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Nancy Moser now brings to life the loves and trials of the first First Lady of the United States. When a dapper, young George Washington comes into her life, Martha Custis is a young widow with two young children. Their love and loyalty toward each other—and the new nation they fight for, lasts a lifetime and is an inspiration even now, after 250 years. Washington’s Lady was a Christy Awards finalist.

 

The Wood’s Edge by Lori Benton

The 1757 New York frontier is home to the Oneida tribe and to British colonists, yet their feet rarely walk the same paths.
 
On the day Fort William Henry falls, Major Reginald Aubrey is beside himself with grief. His son, born that day, has died in the arms of his sleeping wife. When Reginald comes across an Oneida mother with newborn twins, one white, one brown, he makes a choice that will haunt the lives of all involved. He steals the white baby and leaves his own child behind. Reginald’s wife and foundling daughter, Anna, never suspect the truth about the boy they call William, but Reginald is wracked by regret that only intensifies with time, as his secret spreads its devastating ripples.
 
When the long buried truth comes to light, can an unlikely friendship forged at the wood’s edge provide a way forward? For a father tormented by fear of judgment, another by lust for vengeance. For a mother still grieving her lost child. For a brother who feels his twin’s absence, another unaware of his twin’s existence. And for Anna, who loves them both — Two Hawks, the mysterious Oneida boy she meets in secret, and William, her brother. As paths long divided collide, how will God direct the feet of those who follow Him?

TBR:

A Flight of Arrows by Lori Benton

Twenty years past, in 1757, a young Redcoat, Reginald Aubrey stole a newborn boy — the lighter-skinned of Oneida twins —  during the devastating fall of Fort William Henry and raised him as his own.
 
No one connected to Reginald escaped unscathed from this crime. Not his adopted daughter Anna. Not Stone Thrower, the Native American father determined to get his son back. Not Two Hawks, William’s twin brother separated since birth, living in the shadow of his absence and hoping to build a future with Anna. Nor Lydia, who longs for Reginald to be free from his self-imposed emotional prison and embrace God’s forgiveness— and her love.
 
Now William, whose identity has been shattered after discovering the truth of his birth, hides in the ranks of an increasingly aggressive British army. The Redcoats prepare to attack frontier New York and the Continentals, aided by Oneida warriors including Two Hawks, rally to defend it. As the Revolutionary War penetrates the Mohawk Valley, two families separated by culture, united by love and faith, must find a way to reclaim the son marching toward them in the ranks of their enemies.

 

Do you have any suggestions for 4th of July reading?

 

 

Advertisements

8 Responses to “Top 10 Tuesday — Revolutionary Reading!”

  1. Barbara H. July 4, 2017 at 7:53 am #

    I really enjoyed The Messenger and have Washington’s Lady in my Kindle app. A secular one is Johnny Tremain, which I read ages ago with my sons, I think.

    Like

    • rbclibrary July 4, 2017 at 8:03 am #

      My sons liked that one too. Happy 4th of July!

      Like

  2. Paula July 4, 2017 at 8:55 am #

    These look so good! I’ve read the Creole Princess and the other two in this series. Some of my favorites! I have two Lori Benton’s sitting on my shelf waiting to be read. Roseanna White’s Culper Spy Ring series is a winner, one of them fits Revolutionary War period. Gilbert Morris has some. I think Laura Frantz, too. Sally Laity, Amber Lynn Perry. Lots out there , too little time to read. This is probably one of the top time periods on my list! Thanks, I’m adding some to my TBR PILE!

    Like

    • rbclibrary July 4, 2017 at 10:05 am #

      And now you’ve added more to my TBR list! Happy Independence Day!!

      Like

  3. thepowerofwords2016 July 5, 2017 at 9:15 pm #

    Great post as usual, Miss Beckie! The Revolutionary War is my favorite era and there’s just not enough of it in Christian fiction to suit me. I’m kicking myself for not finding time to read Lori Benton yet. Hope to correct that soon. The Courier of Caswell Hall is a favorite of mine. Also loved Ring of Secrets by Roseanna M. White. Now I’m hopefully going to add two to your TBR list …

    First is Daughter of Liberty by J. M. Hochstetler. Absolutely the best, incredible, outstanding, unforgettable. At least, that’s my thoughts. Beautiful combination of history and romance. She’s written 5 in the series so far, which I plan on getting to eventually, all taking place during the Revolution. Joan is a history expert and knows how to make it interesting. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0036DE3B0/ref=series_rw_dp_sw

    Second is Dawn’s Early Light by Elswyth Thane. Secular but clean. A classic probably written in the 50s. My mom introduced me to this author and I love her writing. Dawn’s Early Light is book #1 in her Williamsburg series, which takes one family probably through WWII. I’ve only read the first two, Dawn’s Early Light and Yankee Stranger. Both outstanding and memorable.

    Like

    • rbclibrary July 6, 2017 at 6:55 am #

      Thanks so much, Carole, for the links to these books! They look so good! You are right that there seems to be a lack of CF books in this time period. More emphasis seems to be on the Civil War and WWII. Not sure why that is. I have been following the posts on the re-tooling of Colonial Williamsburg. It’s sad that more people are not interested in the colonial period of our nation.

      Thanks again for the recommendations. Hope you had a great 4th! 🙂

      Like

  4. Carrie July 6, 2017 at 3:22 pm #

    oooo Book of Ages looks really interesting!

    Like

    • rbclibrary July 7, 2017 at 8:13 pm #

      It really was. And it was a great read before I went to Boston. BTW, your comment was sent to spam again. 😦 What is up with that!?

      Like

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: