Book Review: Redeeming Grace

16 Mar

When famine visits Bethlehem, Boaz holds out hope for rain while his relative Elimelech moves his wife Naomi and their sons to Moab. For a while, it appears the Lord is blessing Elimelech’s family, and his sons marry two lovely Moabite women. But calamities strike, one after another, leaving Naomi alone in a foreign land with only her childless daughters-in-law for comfort. When news reaches Naomi that the famine in Bethlehem has lifted, only Ruth will hazard the journey to her mother-in-law’s homeland. Destitute and downhearted, Naomi resigns herself to a life of bitter poverty, but Ruth holds out hope for a better future. And Boaz may be the one God has chosen to provide it.

Combining meticulous research with her endless imagination, Jill Eileen Smith gorgeously renders one of the most beautiful stories in Scripture. Readers will adore this third installment of the inspiring Daughters of the Promised Land series.

 

Jill Eileen Smith is the author of Desert Princess (ebook short) #1 Loves of King Solomon series, the Wives of the Patriarchs series, the Daughters of the Promised Land series, and the bestselling author of the Wives of King David series. When she isn’t writing, she can often be found reading, biking, traveling, spending time with friends, or snugging her feline writing buddy Tiger. She especially enjoys spending time with her family.

To learn more about Jill or for more information about her books, visit her website at http://www.jilleileensmith.com. You can also contact Jill at jill@jilleileensmith.com. She loves hearing from her readers.

 

My Impressions:

I loved the first two books in Jill Eileen Smith’s Daughters of The Promised Land series, The Crimson Cord and The Prophetess. But I think my favorite so far is the latest installment, Redeeming Grace. This retelling of the beloved story of Ruth added dimension to a very familiar tale. Smith is a master at capturing the historical setting and creating believable characters that speak to modern readers while being faithful to the culture of their day. I’ve read and re-read the book of Ruth many times, but this fresh take opened my eyes to the depth of God’s sovereignty portrayed in the Biblical narrative. Thanks Jill, for a wonderful book!

It’s the time of the Judges in ancient Israel, and a famine has gripped the land for years. Naomi’s husband Elimelech seeks prosperity in the land of the enemy, Moab. As the family prospers materially, a spiritual decline occurs, and Naomi yearns for a return to the home of her God. When tragedy strikes, Naomi, bitter in heart, begins the return journey with few possessions, but with a faithful daughter-in-law, Ruth. Can hope replace Naomi’s bitterness?

I loved the backstories that Smith created for each of the main characters. Plausible what-ifs add to the story without altering the truth taken from the biblical record. The reader will take Naomi, Ruth and Boaz into her heart as they struggle with doubts, grief, and questions. Many questions and prayers seem to go unanswered, but God’s sovereignty is powerfully displayed as the rest of the story unfolds. This is really the strength of the novel — a God who is faithful even when we can only see with darkened eyes and partial understanding.

For fans of biblical fiction, Redeeming Grace is a must read, but it is also for anyone who enjoys a good story well-told. It gets a highly recommended rating from me.

Highly Recommended.

Audience: older teens to adults.

To purchase this book, click HERE.

(Thanks to the author and Revell for a complimentary copy. All opinions expressed are mine alone.)

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