Book Review: Maybelle in Stitches

3 Apr

752803Maybelle Kazinzki can’t sew. She was after all, the only girl in the seventh grade Home Economics class to sew the zipper in the neck hole of the A-Line dress they were supposed to make. But when she finds an unfinished quilt in the attic of her mother’s house she gets the crazy idea to finish it—somehow, come heck or high water. She thinks it will help fill the lonely nights while her husband, Holden, is serving overseas during World War II.
Her recently departed mother’s quilt is made from scraps of material Maybelle traces back to her mother’s childhood, her grandmother’s childhood and her own childhood. She tries to add one of Holden’s stripes to it but the sewing is not going well and neither is her life. After receiving some harsh news, Maybelle’s faith falters and she puts the quilt away and stops trusting God. But God is faithful- no matter what. And it’ll take a group of neighborhood women armed with quilting needles to help Maybelle believe that.

 

 

JMagnin-225Joyce Magnin is the author of the Bright’s Pond novels, including the award-winning The Prayers of Agnes Sparrow. A member of the Greater Philadelphia Christian Writers Fellowship, Joyce is a frequent workshop leader and the organizer of the StoryCrafters fiction group. She lives near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

 

My Impressions:

Set during the WWII years, Maybelle in Stitches by Joyce Magnin, is a story of hope amid the uncertainty of life during war. Bound by common experiences and a need to grasp onto positive thoughts, the women of the Sun Shipyard form a sewing circle and sisterhood by making a crazy quilt of memories. If you like sweet stories from bygone days, then pick up this latest in Abingdon’s Quilts of Love series.

Maybelle is a welderette at the local shipyard, doing her part for the war effort. Her husband, Holden, is serving in Europe, and her thoughts often turn towards him. After her mother’s death, Maybelle discovers pieces of cloth that were destined for a crazy quilt. Despite not being domestically-inclined, she is persuaded by best friend Doris and two new friends from the shipyard to make a quilt that will embody the hope they have for their husbands’ safe return.

Magnin again uses her particular voice to bring to life America during WWII. With references to rationing, black outs and the catchy mottos of the time, she makes the reader feel just what life during the mid-1940s was like. I found Maybelle’s encounter with a new wringer washer and the musing of border Roger on the possibilities of canned dog food amusing and nostalgic. The story is realistic, and there are tears and losses as well as happy reunions for those in the Greatest Generation.

A quick read, Maybelle in Stitches is the perfect thing for a trip back to simpler, yet poignant, times.

Recommended.

(Thanks to Abingdon and LitFuse for my review copy. All opinions are mine alone.)

For more reviews, click HERE.

To purchase a copy of this book, click on the image below.

 

Don’t miss this month’s Quilts of Love book, Maybelle in Stitches, by Joyce Magnin. Maybelle can’t sew. But when she finds an unfinished quilt in the attic of her mother’s house, she gets the crazy idea to complete it.

 

qol-maybelle-400-clickJoyce is celebrating the release with a $200 Modcloth giveaway. Enter today for a chance to spruce up your spring wardrobe!

One winner will receive:
A $200 Modcloth gift card
Scraps of Evidence by Barbara Cameron
A Sky Without Stars by Linda S. Clare
Maybelle in Stitches by Joyce Magnin

Advertisements

2 Responses to “Book Review: Maybelle in Stitches”

  1. kellysshining April 5, 2014 at 3:26 pm #

    Thank you for sharing this. I have enjoyed several of Joyce’s books. This will be a departure in what I’ve come accustomed to (Bright’s Pond books). I will definitely have to check it out.

    Like

    • rbclibrary April 5, 2014 at 4:59 pm #

      It is a departure, but Joyce has a distinctive voice that shows through. Maybelle is a “character”. Thanks for stopping by.

      Like

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: